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web site access from internal and external sources

Posted on 2004-04-29
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I've got a single server that is hooked to both a home network and the internet.  I have the internal domain set to abcd.local and the external internet name is abcd.net.  I can get to www.abcd.net just fine externally, but I can't seem to get www.abcd.net to route correctly from the internal network.  I have it set up so that internally I can type www.abcd.local and it works fine, but I would like both internal and external to be able to use www.abcd.net.
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Question by:stringhs
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by:zefiro
ID: 10954751
You will probably have to set-up a DNS zone on the server for the www.abcd.net domain
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vnekic earned 375 total points
ID: 10955388
The other thing you have to consider is that all internet site that your server's DNS doesn't have goes to an external DNS.  Your server routes it to your ISP.

The site is registered at your registrar...   They are pointing your site to a DNS... is that your DNS server?
If so, your internal network will ask your DNS..."Where is abcd.net at?  yours will say...NOT HERE... lets see what ISP DNS says..  ISP will look at the domain and point the internal to registrar (ie NETSOL's records) DNS.  That DNS in turn will push everyone to your site...which is right back to your server.

Can your internal pc's surf the web?  If so, they should be pointed right back to your server like everyone else.

If this is kicking your behind.....let me recommend an easier approach to DNS.  Go look at dyndns.org and get an account.  There you can push your site to any server on the fly.  Sort of like dynip.

Hope this helps...otherwise, to SPEED up lookups, you CAN'T configure the internal.  One of the things with SBS is that the .LOCAL was created for security reasons and for the INTRANET feature.  Use the dyndns w/ your domian name (.net) this is how I got around it with one of our SBS boxes.

you see...your machine is .local !    Not .net, and that is very important for DNS configurations.  Domain Suffix / prefix...some can be changed and added...some can not.  Suffix is one you can't change because that is your domain!

1.  Get an account w/ dyndns.org and read the DNS servers that you need to point to.
2.  Goto your registrar and CHANGE the DNS servers to dyndns.org's  From there you can route to anywhere, mail, ftp, web ...anything.

Hope this helps.

Vlad
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by:stringhs
ID: 10959987
I have a DNS forward lookup zone on the server for www.abcd.net and for www.abcd.local.  The machine provides internet DNS for www.abcd.net.  The problem is that from the internal network I end up at the the router configuration page (the router sees that it is access from the LAN instead of WAN and shows the config page.  I don't want internal machines to get the router config page, I want them to get to the web site the same way that external clients do.

for example...
Internal server IP = 100.0.0.1
Public IP = 200.0.0.1

The DNS server responds 200.0.0.1 for the www.abcd.net lookup whether from internal or external sources.  internal clients end up at the router config because it has the IP 200.0.0.1, I want DNS to send them direct to 100.0.0.1.
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by:JammyPak
ID: 10960799
this is tricky...to summarize (so I understand properly)...you're using the same DNS Serner and zone for internal and external use, but to reach the webserver, internal users need to use a different address than external users. For outside users, the address is translated to an internal server, but for internal users, the translation doesn't occur.

There's a few workarounds I can see...(not all of them you may like)

a) implement separate DNS server for internal and external use (my personal preference)
b) add entries to each internal PC's HOSTS file, so that DNS won't  be used when resolving www.abcd.net (OK, if the # of PC's is small enough)
c) configure your router to do port forwarding for requests on the internal ip address (may not be possible)
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Author Comment

by:stringhs
ID: 10961810
Vlad,
  I didn't end up going with dyndns, didn't quite meet the requirements I had, but the idea sent me in the right direction.  I was able to have the company that provides the domain name set up the DNS zone on their DNS servers.  So external requests will come through their name servers.  Internal requests can go to our internal server which will now map to a internal address.  Thanks for the suggestions everyone.
-Scott
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