Still celebrating National IT Professionals Day with 3 months of free Premium Membership. Use Code ITDAY17

x
?
Solved

How bash shell may emulate Dos F8 or F7 history search

Posted on 2004-04-30
5
Medium Priority
?
476 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi,
i'm quite a newbye of Linux OS. I used to work with MS Windows and the relative Dos shell.
On Linux I really miss a very interesting Dos shell feature. Infact, under Dos, it is possible to write the first word(s) of a command and then press the F8 key, to search against the command history and find the last typed command beginning with that word(s).

For example, suppose that in my Dos session I type the following commands:

  dir c:\
  format a:
  del c:\test\deleteme.txt
  rename c:\test\renameme.txt c:\test\newname.txt

Now if I want to type again the command "format a:" it is only necessary to type:

  c:\>f
or
  c:\>for

and then press F8 on my keyboard to complete the sentence. I don't have to search the history by moving with the arrows on my keyboard.

Pressing F7 on a Dos prompt I can see a menu with the last typed commands, from which i can choose.

Does anyone know how to implement these features in Linux? Especially the first one (F8)?

Thanks

Dario

0
Comment
Question by:bdario
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
5 Comments
 
LVL 45

Expert Comment

by:sunnycoder
ID: 10958465
Hi bdario,

On your command prompt type !beg  where beg is the first few beginning characters of your command and bash will locate the last command beginning with same characters and execute it

Sunnycoder
0
 

Author Comment

by:bdario
ID: 10958524
Hi sunnycoder,
thanks for your quick reply but your solution does not implement the same feature.
Infact i cannot see which command will be executed and it's quite a risk.
Moreover, pressing again F8 in a Dos Shell, i can scroll the list of the last commands beginning with the words typed.
Thanks again
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:owensleftfoot
ID: 10959129
0
 

Author Comment

by:bdario
ID: 10959191
Thanks, it's a very long page! :)) Which paragraph in particular?
0
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 1000 total points
ID: 10959448
In the bash shell you can use Ctrl-r to start an incremental reverse search through the command history. Simply type in part of the command and use additional Ctrl-r's if the first match isn't the one you want.
0

Featured Post

Get free NFR key for Veeam Availability Suite 9.5

Veeam is happy to provide a free NFR license (1 year, 2 sockets) to all certified IT Pros. The license allows for the non-production use of Veeam Availability Suite v9.5 in your home lab, without any feature limitations. It works for both VMware and Hyper-V environments

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

How many times have you wanted to quickly do the same thing to a list but found yourself typing it again and again? I first figured out a small time saver with the up arrow to recall the last command but that can only get you so far if you have a bi…
Little introduction about CP: CP is a command on linux that use to copy files and folder from one location to another location. Example usage of CP as follow: cp /myfoder /pathto/destination/folder/ cp abc.tar.gz /pathto/destination/folder/ab…
Learn several ways to interact with files and get file information from the bash shell. ls lists the contents of a directory: Using the -a flag displays hidden files: Using the -l flag formats the output in a long list: The file command gives us mor…
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.
Suggested Courses

688 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question