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How bash shell may emulate Dos F8 or F7 history search

Posted on 2004-04-30
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi,
i'm quite a newbye of Linux OS. I used to work with MS Windows and the relative Dos shell.
On Linux I really miss a very interesting Dos shell feature. Infact, under Dos, it is possible to write the first word(s) of a command and then press the F8 key, to search against the command history and find the last typed command beginning with that word(s).

For example, suppose that in my Dos session I type the following commands:

  dir c:\
  format a:
  del c:\test\deleteme.txt
  rename c:\test\renameme.txt c:\test\newname.txt

Now if I want to type again the command "format a:" it is only necessary to type:

  c:\>f
or
  c:\>for

and then press F8 on my keyboard to complete the sentence. I don't have to search the history by moving with the arrows on my keyboard.

Pressing F7 on a Dos prompt I can see a menu with the last typed commands, from which i can choose.

Does anyone know how to implement these features in Linux? Especially the first one (F8)?

Thanks

Dario

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Question by:bdario
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Expert Comment

by:sunnycoder
ID: 10958465
Hi bdario,

On your command prompt type !beg  where beg is the first few beginning characters of your command and bash will locate the last command beginning with same characters and execute it

Sunnycoder
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Author Comment

by:bdario
ID: 10958524
Hi sunnycoder,
thanks for your quick reply but your solution does not implement the same feature.
Infact i cannot see which command will be executed and it's quite a risk.
Moreover, pressing again F8 in a Dos Shell, i can scroll the list of the last commands beginning with the words typed.
Thanks again
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LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:owensleftfoot
ID: 10959129
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Author Comment

by:bdario
ID: 10959191
Thanks, it's a very long page! :)) Which paragraph in particular?
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LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 250 total points
ID: 10959448
In the bash shell you can use Ctrl-r to start an incremental reverse search through the command history. Simply type in part of the command and use additional Ctrl-r's if the first match isn't the one you want.
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