directory tim stamp

under what circumstance, the timestamp of the directory will be changed?
the file inside got delete/modify/create?
thanks!
jackie190Asked:
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jlevieCommented:
The timestamp on a directory will change anytime there is a change in the contents of that directory. Obviously, adding/removing files would change the contents, but not so obviously a simple edit of a file will also change the timestamp.
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tfewsterCommented:
Hmm, I disagree that editing an existing file will change the directory timestamp;  The timestamp of the file is held in the files inode. The directory is just a list of inodes and the names associated with those inodes, so I can't see why it would change.

I suppose it could be different for different filesystem types, e.g. if the file grew past a block boundary and the directory referenced the additional blocks/inodes directly.
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jlevieCommented:
I can't say if it "should" change the timestamp as a result of a simple edit, but my statement was based on a direct test. A simple edit did change the timestamp on the directory.
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tfewsterCommented:
jlevie, I don't doubt your word (and I should have guessed that you would test it to ensure your answer was 100% accurate ;-)   What Unix/Filesystem type did you try it on?  Your setup might be more relevant to jackie190's situation than mine...

I ran some tests on HP-UX 11.0 HFS & VXFS filesystems, plus AIX 4.3 (Veritas based?) and Solaris 8 (I think that machine is all UFS filesystems, but I forgot to check) and a "trivial" edit  such as adding a space or blank line didn't change the directory timestamp.
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