• C

What's wrong with this?

Here is what I have so far. I am beginning to write a program.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<iomanip>
#include<time.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int randarray[];
int full;

int main(){

printf("Enter the number of integers you wish to sort.\n");
scanf("%d",&full);


for(int i = 0; i < full; i++)
{
      randarray[i] = rand();
      printf("%d\n",randarray[i]);
}

return 0;


         
     }

Why is it giving me this external error??



lab1.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "int * randarray" (?randarray@@3PAHA)
Debug/letsgo.exe : fatal error LNK1120: 1 unresolved externals
Error executing link.exe.

letsgo.exe - 2 error(s), 0 warning(s)

tmp09Asked:
Who is Participating?
 
Kent OlsenConnect With a Mentor Data Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:
Hi tmp09,

With just a small change (two lines), your code can do what you want.  Define randarray[] as a pointer and reserves space when you know how big it will be.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<iomanip>
#include<time.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int *randarray;
int full;

int main(){

  printf("Enter the number of integers you wish to sort.\n");
  scanf("%d",&full);

  randarray = (int *)malloc (sizeof (int) * full);
  for(int i = 0; i < full; i++)
  {
     randarray[i] = rand();
     printf("%d\n",randarray[i]);
  }

  return 0;
}

Note that you should probably install "sanity checks" to make sure that "full" is a rational size.


Good Luck,
Kent

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Sjef BosmanGroupware ConsultantCommented:
Your randarray has no length, you defined it more or less as a pointer. C requires you to reserve space for the arrays you have (unlike JavaScript). Write
    int randarray[100];
or, even better
    #define MAXRANDS    100
    int randarray[MAXRANDS];

If you want, you can also allocate space dynamically, see your manual on malloc() or calloc();
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tmp09Author Commented:
I don't want to give the array a specific size.  The user needs to determine the size of the array.  So how do I define it without giving it a size?
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tmp09Author Commented:
Does it even matter?? Will the computer just allocate more memory if it needs it?
Or will it lock up if it runs out of array space?
0
 
avizitCommented:
>>Will the computer just allocate more memory if it needs it?

Not automatically, you have to tell the computer to do it .. through malloc() etc .

/abhijit/
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ankuratvbCommented:
You'll also have to seed the random number generator using a call to randomize() or srand().Otherwise,you'll get the same values everytime.

you can use int a[] only when you initialize the values in the declaration itself.
for e.g.

int a[]={1,2,3,4};
it will automatically allocate an array of size 4.

but when u dont initialize the values,you have to provide the array size,or use a pointer and allocate mem. dynamically using malloc.
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dennis_georgeCommented:
Hi,

you cannot define an array without giving it a size. so following are the way by which you can declare an array.

1) directly give some size.
int randarray[256];

2) thorugh #define
#define SIZE 256
int randarray[SIZE];

if you want to do run time allocation
3) through malloc
printf("Enter the number of integers you wish to sort.\n");
scanf("%d",&full);
int *ranarray = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int) * full) ;

4)If you are working in linux or compiler which support C99 standard.
printf("Enter the number of integers you wish to sort.\n");
scanf("%d",&full);
int array[full] ;


But I suggest you tio make use of method 3.

or if you are working in C++ you can use vectors its a dynamic array

Dennis


0
 
Sjef BosmanGroupware ConsultantCommented:
What was wrong with my answer?
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