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various Security Policies

My Windows 2000 server manual does not give a clear understanding of the differences between :

i)  Local Security Policy

ii) Domain Security Policy

and

iii)Domain Controller security Policy

When would you want to use each?

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.


Peter
0
Peter_Fabri
Asked:
Peter_Fabri
2 Solutions
 
IceRavenCommented:
Hi Peter_Fabri,

In essence, the difference is the order in which they are applied.

--Snip---

Domain Controller Security Policy applies only to the domain controllers
container while Domain Security Policy applies to the whole domain. However GP
is applied in this order local>site>domain>OU where a setting defined at the OU
level will override a setting defined at the domain level, etc. Therefore any
settings defined in the Domain Controller Security Policy will override any
identical settings defined at the domain level. There is on notable exception in
that password/account policy for domain  accounts can only be defined at the
domain level. To enable auditing for just domain  controllers, do it in the
Domain Controller Security Policy. To do it for other domain computers, do it at
the local, domain, or OU level based on your needs. Also when you enable
auditing it is an all or nothing deal. You will get the unwanted events along
with the ones you are looking for, though you can use filter view or programs
like Event Comb to scan multiple computers for certain events. Auditing of
account logon will not show user logoffs - you need to audit logon events for
that.

--Snip---

Hope that helps.


Cheers,
IceRaven
0
 
sirbountyCommented:
**With the local security policy, you can control:

Who accesses your computer.
What resources users are authorized to use on your computer.
Whether or not a user or group's actions are recorded in the event log.

**Group Policy is administered through the use of Group Policy Objects, data structures that are attached in a specific hierarchy to selected Active Directory Objects, such as Sites, Domains, or Organizational Units. These GPOs, once created, are applied in a standard order: LSDOU, which stands for (1) Local, (2)Site, (3)Domain, (4)OU, with the later policies being superior to the earlier applied policies.

When a computer is joined to a domain with the Active Directory and Group Policy implemented, a local Group Policy Object is processed. Note that LGPO policy is processed even when the Block Policy Inheritance option has been specified.

Local Group Policy Objects are processed first, and then domain policy. If a computer is participating in a domain and a conflict occurs between domain and local computer policy, domain policy prevails. However, if a computer is no longer participating in a domain, local Group Policy object is applied.

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=221930

**You can use Domain Controller Security Policy to create and manage security policies for domain controllers in the domain.

Screenshots of different policies:
http://www.comptechdoc.org/os/windows/win2kgraph/win2kdsp.html (domain)
http://www.comptechdoc.org/os/windows/win2kgraph/win2kdcsp.html (domain security)
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