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[Debian v3.0 r2] /root & /home/* are worldreadable?!

Hi,
I just want to know if the following is a bug in Debian:

I checked the default (out of the box) permissions of my freshly installed Debian 3.0 r2 installation and found that all directories under /home and the /root are world-readable and world-executable.

Is this normal?

Because I was used to RedHat 8 and all default permissions were 0750 over there...
0
dplus
Asked:
dplus
1 Solution
 
MysidiaCommented:
It's completely normal, and is the default for home directories and /root to be world readable and executable.

For one thing, home directories generally need to be world executable if users are running web sites from a public_html
directory: otherwise, the web server can't get in

(Execute permission on a directory means the ability to access data in it, and get into the immediate child
  directories. Read permission on a directory means the ability to get the list of the names of files stored in that
  directory.)

Users often want to share files with each other on a multiuser system.   If they're working with information that needs to be kept secret, they should of course set the permissions on individual files to read by owner only.

(That way if they want to share something later, when they "open up their home directory" they won't be opening up more than they think to the world)

For the privacy concerned, the best practice is to set a good UMASK that controls default permissions of new files
and directories... it's an option that can be set in the login script, .profile, .tcshrc, .cshrc, etc...  i.e.
 umask 077

077  makes new files mode 600 by default and new directories mode 700 by default, for example
(Since 0777 - 077 = 0700    and  (0700 & 0666) = 0600)


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ahoffmannCommented:
> For one thing, home directories generally need to be world executable if users are running web sites from a public_html directory: otherwise, the web server can't get in

NO, NO
this example just shows a purely/unsecure  configured web server
(rest of explanation is good:)

'cause this is a security TA, I'd sugest 0700 for /home/* and /root
if there is something to share, 0750 for /home/* (but that's unsecure in most cases)
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