OO Design - Object Accessibility

This is less a c# question, and more of an object oriented design question in general, but since I'm using c#, I'm posting it in here.

I am a self taught programmer (books, tinkering, etc) and I seem to be having the same problem over and over again when I design more complex apps.  Here's an example:

Say that there are three classes: Class A, B, and C.

Class A contains an instance of Class B, and Class B contains an instance of Class C.

However, both Class B and Class C need to access an object that's a member of Class A.

The only way i can think of to accomplish this, is to add an instance of the object to Class B and C, and pass the required object from Class A by reference.

A. Is there a better way to do this?
B. Is this problem a result of bad design?  And if so, how could the design be changed to avoid it?
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jdraper3Asked:
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wolfladConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Let A and B keep its arrays of B and C. In the constructor of B and C make sure you take in a reference to class A.

Here is a working example of a way to do it:

      public class A{
            public string theObject = "HOHOHO";
            B[] arrb = null;

            public A(){
                  arrb = new B[10];
                  for(int x=0;x<10;x++){
                        arrb[x] = new B(this);
                  }
            }
      }

      public class B{
            private A myRefToA = null;

            C[] arrb = null;

            public B(A inst){
                  myRefToA = inst;
                  System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("The A object from B: " + myRefToA.theObject);
                  arrb = new C[10];
                  for(int x=0;x<10;x++){
                        arrb[x] = new C(inst);
                  }
            }
      }

      public class C{
            private A myRefToA = null;
            public C(A inst){
                  myRefToA = inst;
                  System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("The A object from C: " + myRefToA.theObject);
            }
      }

Of course if you made A as a Singleton class (only 1 instance) or static class, you'd have no reason to pass the reference to class B and C.
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wolfladCommented:
A.

You are referring to classes and not instances of the classes so my suggestion would be inheritance:

Class A is the topclass. Class B inherits class A and class C inherits class B.

That way class C will have access to all methods & objects of class A & B, while B will have access to all methods & objects of class A.

B.

If A. is correct then it might be caused by bad design.
If class B is just class A with extra objects & method it should inherit A. Same goes for C to B.

If however class B is a huge class that utilizes a lot of other classes and A is just one of them (and a minor part), I would go for the way you described: Class B just uses class A.


-

If you are talking about instances of the classes however you might want to look into Singleton'ing some of the classes.

If you follow your own design, class C would be able to access class A, through class B if the instance of class A is public in class B.

Just my opinion.

-Wolf5
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jdraper3Author Commented:
It's laid out so that Class A contains an array of instances of class B, which contain instances of Class C.

Class B and C both need to access objects that are part of Class A.

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