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DISK ALLOCATION HELP

Posted on 2004-07-30
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
my /dev/hda7  is @ 98%  

I need to allocate more space to this system.

I don't know how to do this.  Will I need another hard drive or can i get some more space from
the existing hd?

I am running Red Hat 7.1

the df -k command returns the following results.

Filesystem           1k-blocks      Used          Available        Use%      Mounted on
/dev/hda8               256667    104840       138575           44%        /
/dev/hda1                54416      8071          43536             16%       /boot
/dev/hda6              2949028    534204      2265020          20%      /home
/dev/hda5              2949028   1225016     1574208          44%      /usr
/dev/hda7               256667    238409         5006               98%     /var
none                        571184         0             571184             0%     /dev/shm

Thank you
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Question by:Cleavis
5 Comments
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 11678154
The easy fix for this would be to identify what directory(s) in /var that are the problem (I'd guess /var/log and/or /var/spool) and move those to /usr or /home. Then symlink  them back to /var.
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LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:brettmjohnson
ID: 11678219
check the files and directories under /var/log.  You may have logfiles
that grown and accumulated over time.  You might want to archive
really old logfiles to tape or DVD-R, then delete them.  If you have
very recent log files that have grown very large, examine them carefully.
They may be filling up with messages related to some failed process
or service that need to be fixed.

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Author Comment

by:Cleavis
ID: 11678231
/var/log & /var/spool are very small

i need to steal some space from another filesystem or add an additional hd.
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Accepted Solution

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Mysidia earned 500 total points
ID: 11678540
What's using up most of the space?

Try
du -h /var |sort -n

Usually it's possible to (for instance) boot into single user mode, move a directory over to /usr and create a symboliclink in the old place to point to the new directory

Ex:
  mv /var/blah /usr
   ln -s /usr/blah /var
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Author Comment

by:Cleavis
ID: 11678608
I see. This will work well for my application. Thank You
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