linux server change file permissions using WS_FTP or command prompt during ftp session on an XP Home

I have an issue wherein I need to change permissions for files on a linux server.  But more than that, since I know very little about this, I am not certain I need to change them AFTER they reach their ultimate destination folder, or if I can change them prior to moving them into their final online home folder.   This online "home" folder is huge, and picking through the files is very difficult.

The files are on the server in a subdirectory.  I need to make them 651.  I connect via either WS_FTP lite or the command prompt on a windows xp home edition.

My host told me the permissions need to be 651.   In WS_FTP, the chmod function offers three sections.  owner group and other.  in there, I can change files to read, write and execute.  I'm not sure how I need to set file permissions to become 651.  I also don't know if I need to do this before they end up in this huge folder or afterwards.  
linqueAsked:
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jlevieConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Mode 651 doesn't make a lot of sense since that would be rw-r-x--x (read/write for owner, read/execute for group and execute for world. In almost all cases if group and other need execute  the owner would also which might mean a mode of 755. Execute permisson is only neaded for directories and files that are spposed to be executed, like complied objects, shell, perl, python, or tcl/tk scripts. Everything else would normally want a file mode that only offers read/write permissions (mode 644 or perhaps 664).

Since a windows box only understands the owner and doesn't have a concept of group or other you'd need to adjust the permissions after transfering the files to the Linux box. If those files really need to be mode 651 you want to set:

owner - read/write
group - read/execute
other - execute
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linqueAuthor Commented:
Thank you for a MOST understandable response to a novice.  Much appreciated.
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