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Connecting 2 networks query

Existing Network (1)
1 x 3Com 24-port 10/100 switch
2 x Windows NT Servers (1 of which is a DC)
10 x PCs running mixture of W2K and WXP
4-port Draytek 2600W ADSL router (set as default gateway)
2 x Cisco 1600 series ISDN routers (to access remote client networks)
2Mb internet access via Draytek router

New Network (2)
1 x Dell 24-port 10/100 switch (+2 gigabit ports)
2 x W2K servers (1 of which is a DC)

Spare Equipment:
3Com 24-port 10/100 hub

Network 1 is using the ip range of 212.270.75.64/255.255.255.192
Network 2 is using the ip range of 10.10.1.0/255.255.255.0

Have physically connected the 2 networks by connecting both switches together.  In an attempt to get both networks to talk to each other, I have brought in my Netgear DG834G 4-port adsl switch/router.  This router is currently connected to the 3Com switch.

Network 1 will eventually become redundant, and the PCs moved over; but needs to be operational at the same time as Network 2 so that we can perform various tests before going ‘live’ on Network 2.  

Although we did not keep the public IPs for Network 1 (we changed ISP), they are only used internally.  We need to keep this ip range until testing is complete – reason is that some of our customers have restricted access to their systems using these IPs.  Until we get all of our customers to change their security to use IPs from our new network, some client PCs will need to remain on the old network for support purposes.

I have played with getting both networks to see each other today with no joy.  I have tried to access the internet from Network 2, again no joy.  It would also appear that since the Netgear has sat on the network, each time a PC boots up in the old network, it is getting assigned IPs from the new network (presumably because Network 2 is winning the DHCP battle due to it having more powerful servers than Network 1) – I thought this a little strange though seeing as the PC was logging into the existing domain (PLATO) and not the new domain (LIVE).

I may not be able to answer any questions until Monday (like info on router set-up, etc.), but if you stack up your questions/suggestions, I’ll check them out and respond.

Cheers!

TEk
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Teknophobia
Asked:
Teknophobia
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1 Solution
 
Tim HolmanCommented:
afaik, the Netgear DG834G 4-port adsl switch/router will only route between your inside networks and the DSL network.  It won't route between two internal networks that are connected to it.

The Cisco 1600 ISDN routers have this ability.  You could ensure that all networks are connected to the same VLAN/hub and use the Cisco 1600 as their default gateway.  The Cisco would then have routes pointing to 10.10.10.x and 217.x.x.x.

The Draytek may also be up for the job.

Performance will suck a little bit.

Does the Dell switch have routing ability ?
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TeknophobiaAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your reply Tim.

I do not know how to set-up the Cisco to do this (it's a 1603 btw) - in fact, I did not think it could do this.  It used to be the ISDN internet gateway years ago, but got left behind when we went ADSL.

I've looked at the running config, but still cannot work out how to do it - some pointers would be very much appreciated.   Do I just enter ip route 10.10.0.0 255.255.0.0 10.10.1.0, or does it need to point to a particular device/ip?

In answer to your query on the Dell Switch, I checked the Dell forums, and it is a Layer 2 switch - for communication between different VLANs, you must use a router or Layer 3 device.  http://forums.us.dell.com/supportforums/board/message?board.id=pc_managed&message.id=2487

Thanks again.

TEk


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Tim HolmanCommented:
If you've only the one router:

212.270.75.64/255.255.255.192
|
212.270.75.70 (made up)
router
10.10.1.1 (made up)
|
10.10.1.0/255.255.255.0

..then directly connected networks do not need added routes, however, machines on network A need to know to get to machines on network B via the router.
So, client A needs a static route setup - if windows, then route add 10.10.1.0 255.255.255.0 212.270.75.70
..and client B needs route add 212.270.75.64 255.255.255.192 10.10.1.1
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TeknophobiaAuthor Commented:
I cant seem to get this working at all, and am wondering if my 2 Cisco 1603 ARE able to do the job.

I have added what I believe is the right ip routes, but no joy.  I've even used configmaker to get them to talk to each other, but getting "EthernetLAN_1 and EthernetLAN already have established connections to different subnetworks" error when trying to join the 2 networks together.

I'm wondering if it's because the 1603's only have 1 x 10/100 ethernet port on them (and 1 x ISDN).  I guess if they had 2, I would be able to configure them individually.

Also, the add route thing mentioned earlier doesn't work either, keep getting route: bad argument 10.10.1.1 (or 212.270.75.70).

I'm thinking of going down the linux route as a mate of mine tells me this is much easier and he'll be able to guide me, BUT it would be much nicer to get this working without having to do this.

Please remember that I am not THAT network savvy, so go easy on any explanations!!

Cheers,

TEk
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Tim HolmanCommented:
Have you tried using subinterfaces ?
eg - physical interfaces are FastEthernet0/1, but you can have additional subinterfaces, eg FastEthernet0/1.1, FastEthernet0/1.2, each with different IP address, which are virtual as far as the Cisco goes, but real routable IP addresses as far as the rest of the network goes.
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TeknophobiaAuthor Commented:
I finally got this working last night by using Devil-Linux (specially for Firewalls/Routers/Gateways).  Works a treat!  All it needs is a PC with a CD and FDD (don't need to install OS on PC, just boot from CD and keep configuration on FDD).  Both networks now talking to each other.

Thanks for the help though.

TEk
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