What is "Radius" stands for ??

hello all ..
during my training in an ISP .. i heard about the Radius many times ..
is it a web server ? .. or traffic server .. ? what is it ?
what they mean exactly with the Radius ?
thank you for answering my questions :) .
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grbladesConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi 3ezz,
Radius is an authentication server and is used for thinks like authenticating people dialing into an ISP via modems. It is also commonly used for authentication by a lot of other networking equipment such as VPN servers and wireless access points.
ChireruConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Remote Authenticaion Dial-In User Service

Basically, it authenticates users that dial-in, or vpn-in, (or even, through wireless), and allows them to use the network.
It is installed on a server in your network, and modem banks, or VPN servers, or access points are pointed at them for user authentication.

Examples are OpenRADIUS, FreeRADIUS, Microsoft Routing & Remote Access Service.
3ezzAuthor Commented:
grblades  and Chireru  thank you alot .. can i find some articles about this ..  ?
Routing and Remote Access !!@ ? how can this be ? ..
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grbladesConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Freeradius website - http://www.freeradius.org/
There is a link to the FAQ there and at the bottom of this there are some references to other sources of information.
ChireruConnect With a Mentor Commented:
My mistake: What I meant to say was that RRAS is a RADIUS client, as it is a VPN / Dial-in server.  Microsoft IAS is the RADIUS server.

Places where you can get more information on it are:
RADIUS is most commonly used together (or: as part of) IEEE 802.1X AAA (Authentication, Authorization, Accounting).
Within 802.1X it is involved in the "back-end" of the user authentication process.
802.1X specifies three roles: the 1X Supplicant (this is the device that wants to enter the network, i.e. the one the user sits in front of), the 1X Authenticator (this one takes the admission request from the supplicant and sends it to the third part), and the Authentication Server (which decides to either grant or deny the supplicants access; mostly often located within an ISP backbone).
The transport protocol between Authenticator and Authentication Server can be the RADIUS protocol.
Please note that RADIATOR has aged and has a few shortcomings, so that a follow-up protocol was developed by the IETF (Internet Engineering task force): the Diameter protocol. For more information about the shortcomings of RADIUS and the advent of Diameter please see RFC3588:

Stefan Winter
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