Some Easy Questions ??????

i have linux redhat9.0
I Know That The Purpose Of The File /etc/rc.d/rc.local Is That You Just Enter Some Commands In It And These Commands Will Be Execute After The Booting Process Of Linux.

If I Put
mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /mnt/windows  
this command in /etc/rc.d/rc.local
then my c: (Drive) will be mounted each time when i start linux.

I want that
when i boot my linux then it will terminate or formate my d: (hda5)
each time when linux start.
so for that i must put the command
mount -t vfat /dev/hda5 /mnt/windows  
In    rc.local
now what is the next command to format or completely delete the partition hda5 or D:

If You Dont Know About This Stupidity
Then Just Tell Me The Process Of Formating any vfat drive from linux redhat 9.0


thanxxxxxxxxx you all



bbaiubAsked:
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GnsConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Um, why do you put the first mount in rc.local? Something wrong with setting it to automatically mount in /etc/fstab?
Oh, and why have a scratch area that you zero each time you start linux?
... And you don't have to mount on /mnt/windows ... you can well mount it anyplace you like. Say you want to mount /dev/hda1 ("c:") on /mnt/win_c and /dev/hda5 on /mnt/win_d, the (first time only) you need create these directories
mkdir /mnt/win_c
mkdir /mnt/win_d
... Then you put something like
/dev/hda1 /mnt/win_c vfat defaults 0 0
in /etc/fstab so that mount -a can handle it at boot, and use a slightly modified variant of pYranias vfat advice for the scratchpad like
mkfs -t vfat /dev/hda5
mount -t vfat /dev/hda5 /mnt/win_d
in /etc/rc.d/rc.local ... You might have an entry for it in fstab too, so that it is easier to handle (umount /mnt/win_d ... etc), something like
/dev/hda5 /mnt/win_d vfat defaults,noauto 0 0
where the "noauto" option make sure it _doesn't_ get mounted automatically, and thus won't be in the way for the fs-creation.

But I'm really curious as to why you would want this type of setup.

-- Glenn
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pYraniaCommented:
it highly depends on the filesystem you want to format the partition with

for ext3 use the following:
mke2fs -j /dev/hda5
mount -t ext3 /dev/hda5 /mnt/windows

for vfat you might use:
mkfs -t vfat /dev/hda5
mount -t vfat /dev/hda5 /mnt/windows
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owensleftfootCommented:
parted -s rm /dev/hda5 will delete the hda5 partition.
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pYraniaCommented:
maybe he hasn't heard about tmpfs yet.
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GnsCommented:
Might be it. Hopefully we'll get to know though.

-- Glenn
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rdoctaneCommented:
mkfs.vfat -F FAT-size

if you dont specify it'll give you 12 or 16 bit...if you want fat32, you have to specify it

~joe~
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