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Conversion from CString to char *s [ C style string]

Posted on 2004-08-03
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Last Modified: 2008-01-09
Hi folks:

How do I convert  a CString to char *  [C- style string]? Thanks in advace
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Question by:rxraza
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LVL 55

Expert Comment

by:Jaime Olivares
ID: 11706406
To simply point to the contents of the string:

CString str;
str = "test";

const char *strPtr;
strPtr = str;

If you want to copy contents to a char array:

char buffer[200];  // arbitrary size, you choose
strcpy(buffer, str);
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Accepted Solution

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SteH earned 50 total points
ID: 11706491
CString str = "What ever you want";

char pString[200];

strcpy (pString, str.operator LPCTSTR ()); // or use operator LPCTSTR () whenver you need a const C style string.

To get a pointer to a buffer you are aloowed to modify use
str.GetBuffer () ; // or GetBufferSetLength ()
and when finished using this buffer call
str.ReleaseBuffer (-1); // -1 if the string is 0 terminated else you need to supply the number of valid chars.
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Author Comment

by:rxraza
ID: 11706632
I like operator LPCTSTR() approach better.
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:SteH
ID: 11706663
In the comment from  jaime_olivares the operator LPCTSTR () will be called as well. In his pointer assignment
strPtr= str;
it will be used implicitely.
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Expert Comment

by:Jaime Olivares
ID: 11706759
>In the comment from  jaime_olivares the operator LPCTSTR () will be called as well. In his pointer assignment
It is not necessary because in my example strPtr is of type: const char *
Try to compile and gives you no warning

In steh comment:
strcpy (pString, str.operator LPCTSTR ()); // or use operator LPCTSTR () whenver you need a const C style string.

str.operator LPCTSTR(),   or better (LPCTSTR)str     is not necessary because second argument of strcpy expect a const char *, and LPCTSTR returns a const char *
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:SteH
ID: 11706862
The intention of my comment was to make rxraza aware that
CString str ("xxxx");
const char* pStr = str; // this line will call operator LPCTSTR () implicitly.

You don't need to write it explicitly. But since it is called why don't write it to show that a conversion/casting is happening here.
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