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VPN vs Terminal Services

Posted on 2004-08-03
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I have several questions regarding this topic:
1. What is the main difference between a VPN and Terminal Services?
2. Do you need a VPN to run Terminal Services?
3. Terminal Services allows you to see a remote desktop, what do you see with a VPN?
4. Is a VPN like a LAN where you see files and directories like a local machine on a LAN?
5. How do you run programs on a server through a VPN, Thin client?

I am trying to figure out the best way to connect various locations so that they can all use the same programs.
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Question by:ralphsauto
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by:shad0_cheng
shad0_cheng earned 120 total points
ID: 11708658
1. VPN is a secure connection, terminal service can be run on top of VPN to give you a remote control of a window session.
2. No
3. Nothing, just a secure connection
4. Yes if setup that way (and most do), VPN allows you to connect to the your network from another location which will allow you to see and browse other computers.
5. whatever you do on the server will be through Terminal Service or Shell, VPN just provide a way to get there.

Basically, VPN is the bridge/road and Terminal services is like train that runs on it, hope that helps
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by:fatlad
ID: 11709132
Unless you mean the SSL VPNs that are now being pushed by vendors, they confuse matters even more by basically being an SSL encrypted tunnel to a terminal server. Try www.neoteris.com for more info
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by:SamuraiCrow
ID: 11709262
Just a little more clarification on the VPN.  This is a virtual circuit established between a client computer and a concentrator device on your network (often a firewall or other VPN hardware).  It basically serves as:

1. An initial layer of authentication
2. A 'private' connection to your network over the public internet

Once this connection to your network is created any services that you have configured to be delivered over the VPN (ie Remote Desktop, Email, etc...) would be accessable.
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ngravatt earned 135 total points
ID: 11710129
VPN and terminal services are going to be two different technologies.

1) a VPN is an extension of your LAN.  A remote user can create a VPN tunnel to your network and it will appear as if they are connected directly to the LAN.  Terminal services is a service that provides a multisession environment that allows client devices to access a virtual desktop session and Windows-based programs running on the server.  It works guite the same way as Remote Desktop does, it will allow a user to logon a server from a remote location.

2)Yes and No.  No if you are trying to run terminal services on a machine that is on your network.  You should not have to use VPN service to do anything on you LAN if you are directly connected to it.  But, if you are at home, and want to run terminal services on a computer at the office, you will need to create a VPN to your LAN and then run terminal services.

3)A VPN allows you to see the network on the other side of the firewall.  Most LANs are designed with a firewall blocking internet traffic.  So, VPNs are designed so that you go around the firewall.

4)Yes.  A VPN creates a secure tunnel from your machine, to the VPN concentrator located on your network.  All the data from your machine to the VPN concentrator is encrypted.

5)same way you would if you were on the LAN.  This will all depend on what VPN concetrator and client you use.  If you use a VPN dialer (client), all of you traffic is encrypted and transfered through the VPN concentrator.  Newer, clientless VPN connections requrire a little more configuration on the adminstrative side but do not require a dialer.  If you make a VPN connection through your browser (clientless), file and application access will have to be configured on the VPN concentrator.

let me know which questions to elaborate on.
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by:deemehtani
deemehtani earned 120 total points
ID: 11710495
VPN: Virtual Private Network - Create a private encrypted tunnel of your own over the internet, not accessible to others, just authenticated user only.

VPN: Usually provides access to the local LAN through the internet as if the connecting PC was local to the LAN (usually configured that way)

TS: Terminal Services - Usually creates a user session to access the remote desktop, it usually creates a virtual desktop copy of the hosting server and provides the softwares and the network access based on the hosting server and usually the domain policies.

TS: need not necessarily be over VPN, it can be connected directly through the RDP client or can be hosted using TSweb.
More info on TS: http://www.bluelink.ca/support/terminal-faq.asp ( i find them useful not to advertize or anything of that sort)

VPN can be configured through windows or you can have a firewall allowing VPN.


--Dee
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