special RE variables

I need to perform the following operation on regular expressions:
I have a string, say, bFFacdABCf, that matches a pattern, say, ab!acd!fac , where ! is a sequence of any letters. I want to be able for each match to create the following pair:
! - FF
! - ABC ...etc

Is there a special variable that can be used as a result of matching? If not, what's the way to do this?
thnx
ole111Asked:
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ozoCommented:
@matches = "abFFacdABCfac" =~ /ab(.*)acd(.*)fac/;
print map"! - $_\n",@matches;
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ole111Author Commented:
Apparently, I did not express myself properly.
The problem is that I don't know in advance how the pattern will look, i.e. it might be ab!acd!, or abac!d, or a!!cd etc...
Given that there is a match with a string, I still need to be able to create the pairs...
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
Ozo's approach works if you _know_ the pattern, right? So you just need to modify the input pattern, with its ! notation, and change that to be a Perl regular expression that will work like Ozo's.

$pattern = "ab!acd!fac";
$string = "abFFacdABCfac";
$regex_pattern = $pattern =~ s/!/(.*)/g;
@matches = $string =~ /$regex_pattern/;
print "! - $_\n" foreach @matches;

==============

But the string you gave is only a partial match for the pattern. Is that intentional? It makes the problem MUCH more difficult to solve in general. For an example, see the discussion in

http:Q_21065267.html

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ole111Author Commented:
When I try the line
@matches = $string =~ /$regex_pattern/;
what happens is that the whole string is matched (correctly). print "$_" returns 1.
Is this what should be expected?
What I want is to be able to get out of this match all the cases when ! (which in the regex_pattern would stand for something like \w*) is substituted for whatever it has to be. (Taken the above example, there are 2 such cases: 1. ! is substituted with FF, 2. ! is substituted with ABC). The essential thing for me is to be able to extract all such cases that happen during the match.

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jmcgOwnerCommented:
Forgot some parens:

$pattern = "ab!acd!fac";
$string = "abFFacdABCfac";
($regex_pattern = $pattern) =~ s/!/(.*)/g;
@matches = $string =~ /$regex_pattern/;

print "regex pattern: ", $regex_pattern, "\n";

print "! - $_\n" foreach @matches;


When I run that, I got the results:

regex pattern: ab(.*)acd(.*)fac
! - FF
! - ABC

======

That looks to be what you wanted except for the possible problem of wanting partial matches.
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ole111Author Commented:
Yeap, thnx.
Can I have one more small Q (for the same price :)
If I want to split /usr/bin/ I cannot write
split (/// "/usr/bin/");
what is the correct way?
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
There's two approaches.

  split /\//, "/usr/bin/";

uses backslash inside the regex to make the following slash a literal rather than allowing it to be interpreted as a closing delimiter.

  split m{/}, "/usr/bin/";

is just one example of the other approach. Most regular expression grammars allow you to use alternate delimiters. This was even true of the UNIX 'ed' editor 30-some years ago. I tend to use curly braces except in situations where I'd have to put a backslash in front of a curly brace in the regex. For { }, [ ], ( ), and < >, the delimiters work as matched pairs. For other characters, you just use the same character to open and close.

   split m#/#, "/usr/bin/";
   split m!/!, "/usr/bin/";
   split m</>, "/usr/bin/";

By the way, if you split that particlar string with m{/}, you'll get one empty element at the front, then "usr", and finally "bin". There's no empty element at the end, since Perl lists are trimmed at the last non-empty element in this and a number of other contexts.
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ole111Author Commented:
that's ok, i found it myself. thnx
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ole111Author Commented:
oh , i did not realize there was a new message. thanks for the answer.
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