Solved

error C2110: cannot add two pointers

Posted on 2004-08-04
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3,576 Views
Last Modified: 2008-03-17
Hello experts,

what is the best way to achieve the following;

      char name[20];
      char lName[20];
      char fName[20];

                cout << "\nEnter Customer's LAST Name : ";
      cin >> lName;
      cout << "\nEnter Customer's FIRST Name : ";
      cin >> fName;
      

If user inputs the following

                                  Last Name: Browne
                                  First name: Jack

I need name to output the following

                       name: Browne, Jack.

How do I add to two together and include the comma.

Thank you
0
Comment
Question by:claracruz
7 Comments
 
LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:AlexFM
ID: 11713919
char result[100];

...

strcpy(result, lName);
strcat(result, ", ");
strcat(result, fName);
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:lemmeC
ID: 11713936
How about this:

strcat(lName,',');
strcat(lName, fName); //lName has to be big enough to hold the entire string


Alternately, use the STL string class for fName and lName.

string fName, lName;
string Name;

cout << "\nEnter Customer's LAST Name : ";
cin >> lName;
cout << "\nEnter Customer's FIRST Name : ";
cin >> fName;

Name = lName + ',' + fName;

cout << Name;

0
 
LVL 14

Accepted Solution

by:
Daniel Junges earned 500 total points
ID: 11714408
Other solution would be:

char name[20];   <-- ensure the size is big enough
char lName[20];
char fName[20];

sprintf(name, "%s,%s", fName, lName);
0
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LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 11715214
>>strcat(lName,',');
>>strcat(lName, fName); //lName has to be big enough to hold the entire string

FYI:
I'm sure the above is a typo.
strcat requires double quotes.
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 11715243
Since you're programming in C++, I agree with lemmeC alternate method, which uses std::string.

It's safer, and you don't have to worry about the maximum size of the name.
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:lemmeC
ID: 11715340
>>I'm sure the above is a typo.
>>strcat requires double quotes.

Right Axter.

Probably the same holds for the alternate part as well.
Name = lName + '', '' + fName;

By the way, the exact same solution also appears in http://www.msoe.edu/eecs/cese/resources/stl/string.htm
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 11715508
>>Probably the same holds for the alternate part as well.
>>Name = lName + '', '' + fName;

If you need the extra space after the comma, then you do need double quotes.
If you only need one character, you can use single quotes.
name = lName + ',' + fName; //This does work for std::string
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