Solved

Limiting C: drive size during RIS installation

Posted on 2004-08-04
3
567 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-14
I have a Windows 2000 Remote Installation Server with a few desktop images on it.

One of my desktop images requires a hard drive partitioned into C: and D: drives.  Understanding that RIS will only install a C: drive, is there a way to limit the size of that C: drive, so that it does not automatically use the entire drive?  RIS seems to allocate the entire boot hard drive to the system (C:) partition.

Right now, I'm resizing the C: partition after installation, then adding the D: drive.  If possible, I'd like to skip the resizing step.
0
Comment
Question by:sloth10k
3 Comments
 
LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
magus123 earned 125 total points
ID: 11720197
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/en/datacenter/help/default.asp?url=/windows2000/en/datacenter/help/sag_RIS_FAQs.htm
 Does the RIPrep wizard support multiple disks or multiple partitions on a given client computer?
Solution: No. The RIPrep utility supports only a single disk with a single partition (C:\drive) in this release of Remote Installation Services.

How does the RIPrep wizard deal with disks that differ in size between the source computer used to create the image and the destination computer that will receive it ?

Solution: Disk preparation of the destination computer is identical to that of the source computer, and any remaining disk capacity on the destination computer will be formatted. For example, if the source computer disk capacity is 1 gigabyte (GB) and the disk capacity of the destination computer is 2 GB, the entire 2 GB will be formatted on the destination computer. Remote Installation Services can support formatting the destination computer's hard disk to match the same physical size of the source computer. For more information on managing the client computer disk reformatting process, see Creating an installation image



maybe helps??
http://www.emboot.com/products_RISME.htm
0
 

Author Comment

by:sloth10k
ID: 11720341
Bingo!

By changing the information in the .sif file associated with an installation image, you can restrict the disk reformatting to be the same as what the source computer used to create the installation image. For example, open the Ristndrd.sif file located in the \\REMINST\Setup\Applicable language\Images\Applicable image name\I386\Templates\Ristndrd.sif folder and modify the UseWholeDisk parameter to equal NO. When a client computer installs this image, the disk will be formatted to match the capacity of the source computer and the balance of the destination computer's disk will be unformatted.

Thanks for the assistance.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:philippedr
ID: 12150782
Sloth

Have you tested this with riprep images?

thx
0

Featured Post

NAS Cloud Backup Strategies

This article explains backup scenarios when using network storage. We review the so-called “3-2-1 strategy” and summarize the methods you can use to send NAS data to the cloud

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

NTFS file system has been developed by Microsoft that is widely used by Windows NT operating system and its advanced versions. It is the mostly used over FAT file system as it provides superior features like reliability, security, storage, efficienc…
Do you use a spreadsheet like Microsoft's Excel?  Have you ever wanted to link out to a non excel file on your computer or network drive?  This is the way I found to do it!
This tutorial gives a high-level tour of the interface of Marketo (a marketing automation tool to help businesses track and engage prospective customers and drive them to purchase). You will see the main areas including Marketing Activities, Design …
With Secure Portal Encryption, the recipient is sent a link to their email address directing them to the email laundry delivery page. From there, the recipient will be required to enter a user name and password to enter the page. Once the recipient …

809 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question