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Excessive network traffic from workstation on W2000 Domain

Posted on 2004-08-04
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Last Modified: 2010-04-11
Here's an interesting situation thats got me stumped:

To facilitate the move of two employees, I physically switched the location of their Win98 workstations on our W2000 server domain. Prior to the move, both employees worked on their workstations, and everything was fine. After the move, one of the workstations, as soon as it started up, generated so much traffic on the LAN that no one could access the server. Even the offending workstation itself could not see the domain controller to log on.

Note that just moments before, in its previous location, this was not an issue.

To eliminate faulty wiring or some other hardware issue, I hooked up another workstation in this same location. No problem.

I checked the workstation for spyware, viruses, and programs running at startup that might communicate with the network. I removed what little spyware there was, there were no viruses or unecessary programs running at startup.

Any ideas? I thought about the network card, but it was working fine just moments before, and shows no indications of a problem.

Thanks,
Bill
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Question by:westone
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4 Comments
 
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by:
dullz earned 250 total points
ID: 11722780
Connect to the network and type 'netstat -e' and see if you get many errors or discards.  If so I would replace the network card.

Another solution is to run a packet sniffing progam on that computer (like http://www.ethereal.com/) to see what traffic its putting out on the network.
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by:cazzer
ID: 11726497
Are you connected by a switch or a hub? If it's a switch, try rebooting it.
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Expert Comment

by:tropsmr2
ID: 11741296
I agree, run Ethereal.  Fastest way to see what is happening.  Also, check for SASSER infection - that chews up a ton of network bandwidth (should be happening in both locations though).
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Author Comment

by:westone
ID: 11782658
I replaced the NIC and it is fine now. I guess it didn't like being moved.

When the existing NIC was pulled out, it was covered in cobwebs! I've seen some dusty PCs, this one looked like the inside of a haunted house!

Thanks,
Bill
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