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SCO Unix: Disk running out of space

I'm running SCO Unix 3.2v5.0.4 in a 2 GB hard disk. I've cleared up some files that can be truncated, temp files and log files to increase the disk capacity but only manage to gain around 8 MB space. This is the output of a dfspace command:
/                    Disk space: 15.37 MB of 300.00 MB available (5.13%)
/stand            Disk space: 7.23MB of 14.99 MB available (48.22%)
/txpasys        Disk space: 33.28 MB of 250.00 MB available (13.31%)
/txpproz         Disk space: 45.61 MB of 130.00 MB available (35.09%)
/txpproj         Disk space: 151.82 MB of 239.98 MB available (63.26%)
/txparc.00.00 Disk space: 119.33 MB of 804.67 MB available (14.83%)
Total disk space : 372.67 MB of 1739.66 MB available (21.42%)

After doing du -sk * command in /root, I found out that the /opt directory consumes around 215 MB. Since I have around 260 MB unused space in my hard disk, can I use them to hold the /opt directory? If so, what are the steps that I should take?
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azmiis
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azmiis
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gheistCommented:
It depends on what you would like to accomplish.....
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azmiisAuthor Commented:
What I would like to have is more space in the root directory because after sometime /usr and /var directories will keep on increasing. Just before I truncated the 'safe' files, 98% of the /root directory had been used up.
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gheistCommented:
Now I understand -
easiest is to buy new disk for /var /tmp /usr and /home or so

anyway some care should be taken with all filesystems which are used over 50%

readjusting filesystem sizes is complicated matter - usually you create pax or cpio or tar archive of data, umount, adjust partitions and put files back. For / you will need to install correct bootloaders too, which involves using install media.

And next time when installing some kind of UNIX leave half of disk unpartitioned to accomodate growth.

Or alternatively with experience gained on space usage now you can install a new system with adequate partitioning.
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gheistCommented:
I usually link /opt to /usr/opt . but this will not help you since you do not have separate /usr filesystem
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azmiisAuthor Commented:
I have around 260 MB of unpartitioned space in the hard disk. Can I used it? If possible, please put it in step-by-step procedure as i'm new in unix system and still learning on it. TQ
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gheistCommented:
basically you neet to run divvy, add a partitions for /var and maybe /tmp, I will explain in detail how to add /var only

then run init 1 ( drop into single (? or was it called SysAdmin mode ) user mode )
close anything still running, then mount /var to some new directory under /
then ( cd /var && tar cpf - ) | ( cd /new_place && tar xfp - )
then adjust /etc/mnttab andmaybe /etc/vfstab to accomodate new filesystem
then umount /new_place
now mount /var
ls -l /var
df
mount
if this seems fine umount /var
rm -rf /var/*
reboot or (mount /var ; init 3 )

manual pages for every command or file will explain you much better.
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gheistCommented:
ensure you make backups before such alterations - they never work in first times
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