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One PC in Workgroup cannot see printer server

Posted on 2004-08-05
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I have a small workgroup of PC's (5) running WinXP.  One of the PC's is acting as a printer server.  Three of the PC's can see the print server and install the printer.  One machine, the newest machine in the workgroup cannot see the printer server.  I am fairly certain that the problem lies somewhere in that PC.  The user is able to log into one of the other PC's and can see and install the printers fine.

I know very little about workgroups, so any suggestions would be appreciated.
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Question by:SherryG
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by:pseudocyber
ID: 11725693
Can the one PC that can't "see" ping the "print server"?

Start-Run-"cmd"   then press enter.

At command line:  ping x.x.x.x        - where x.x.x.x is the IP address of the target machine.
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by:SherryG
ID: 11725845
The PC cannot ping the print server.
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by:pseudocyber
ID: 11725978
Please look through this and let us know how your testing goes:


Troubleshooting Microsoft Networking

Most of these articles are intended to be used with Windows XP on the client side.  However, they can also apply to Windows servers with network connectivity issues.  Cabling, duplex mismatch, and ICMP(ping) testing also apply to other operating systems.

Table of contents

Check the cabling

Duplex Mismatch

Ping Help
Ping the loop back to test the stack
Ping the NIC to test the NIC
Ping the default gateway to test network connectivity
Ping a site by name      
Ping a site by IP
Run Trace Route


How to troubleshoot network connectivity problems
How to troubleshoot TCP/IP connectivity with Windows XP      
How to Troubleshoot TCP/IP Connectivity with Windows 2000 or Windows NT
How to reset Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in Windows XP
How to determine and recover from Winsock2 corruption
How to disable simplified sharing and set permissions on a shared folder in Windows XP
"Access is Denied" Error Message When You Try to Open a Folder
How to set, view, change, or remove file and folder permissions in Windows XP
Access Denied Error When Attempting to Connect to a Network Share
How to Capture Network Traffic with Network Monitor
How to Install the Support Tools from the Windows XP CD-ROM
Description of the Network Monitor Capture Utility
How to install NetBEUI on Windows XP
 
Check the cabling
The first thing to check, with network problems is the cabling.  Verify it’s completely plugged in and not a little loose.  Most “modern” copper network cabling is Cat5, Cat5e, or Cat6.  Cat refers to category.  This means speed the cable is rated for.  The higher number, the better for “speed” and also the expense.  When I refer to cabling, I am not referring to fiber cabling – although physical issues such as unplugging can also affect fiber cabling.

Copper cabling can be susceptible to Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI).  Care should be taken not to run copper cabling over phlorescent lights, near large electrical motors, or other sources of high EMI.

Ethernet Cat5, Cat5e, or Cat6 cabling should not be run over 100m (~328 feet) without the use of repeaters, hubs, or switches in between segments.

If a patch cable does not work – make sure it’s a straight through, not a cross over.  Straight through cabling will be color coded the same on both ends.  If the cabling is 568B pinout, the color pattern will be:

White with orange
Orange with white
White with green
Blue with white
White with blue
Green with white
White with brown
Brown with white.

An alternative pin out color scheme is 568A in which case the oranges and greens are swapped.

Cross Over cable – a cross over cable will swap the transmit pair with the receive pair.  This will let two similar devices communicate by crossing receive to transmit and vice versa.  Cross over cables will have oranges and greens swapped from one end to the other.

Roll Over cable – a roll over cable will “roll over” pins 1 through 8 to be pins 8 through 1 on the other end.  These are commonly used with network equipment in a  communications port.

Split Pair – please note – if you are doing your own cable termination, you CANNOT wire a cable so that pin 1 is color A on both ends, pin 2 is color B on both ends, pin 3 is color C on both ends and so on.  If you do, this will result in a “split pair” which will cause errors on the wire in the form of “near end cross talk”.

Duplex Mismatch
An insidious, common problem is a duplex mismatch.  Duplex refers to a device’s ability to listen and talk at the same time – or not.  A device which is operating in half duplex can only send OR receive – but not both at the same time.  

A device operating in half duplex mode uses Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) – a mechanism in which the device can tell if electrical signals have “collided”, alert other devices on the segment there has been a collision, and a way to retransmit while hopefully avoiding another collision during the retransmission.

A device operating in full duplex mode turns off the CD part – it does not detect when a collision occurs because there should be no collisions with two devices operating in full duplex mode.  Devices in full duplex are able to transmit and receive at the same time.  They typically only achieve this ability when plugged into another device which can operate in full duplex – such as a switch.

The problem occurs when there is a misconfiguration on one end of the connection and one device is set for Autonegotiation while the other side is not.  In this scenario, the side set for autonegotiation is unable to autonegotiate, because the side set for full duplex does not negotiate.  The autonegotiate side will assume it is talking to a device which is incapable of autonegotiation and to be backwards compatible with older equipment, WILL CONFIGURE ITSELF FOR HALF DUPLEX.  In this scenario, the full duplex side will not listen for collisions and the half duplex side will.  The full duplex side will see frames with Frame Check Sequence (FCS) and Alignment errors while the half duplex side will see late collisions and giant frames.  If a PC is set for 100 Full duplex and it is connected to an unmanaged, autonegotiating switch, there WILL BE NO ERROR STATISTICS to tell the user or administrator there is a problem.

What makes this particularly insidious, is that basic PING testing will succeed.  The user will be able to access files, the internet, print, and so on.  However, as the size and frequency of the packets increases, so will the errors resulting in retransmissions of packets and delayed reassembly of large datagrams due to higher layer retransmission requests.  This will result in approximately 1/10th the perceived throughput with large file transfers.

Although autonegotiate to autonegotiate should negotiate correctly to the highest speed and duplex, the key word is SHOULD.

Best practice is for devices which do not move much – servers – or for devices which optimal speed is desired – should be configured with manually set speed and duplex – for instance 100Mbps and Full Duplex on both sides of the connection.

Devices which connect to unmanaged devices – devices which rely upon autonegotiate should also be configured as autonegotiate.  In cases where autonegotiate is not working correctly, the configurable side should be configured for HALF duplex and let the autonegotiate side also select HALF duplex.

Please see the following chart for autonegotiate settings:
Auto> 100 Full = duplex mismatch & lots of errors
100 Full > Auto = duplex mismatch & lots of errors
100 Full > 100 Full = good config no errors
Auto> Auto = SHOULD be ok, may not be.  Possible errors.
Auto> x speed HALF duplex = SHOULD be ok.  May not be, because of speed mismatch.

Using “ping” to troubleshoot connectivity.
PING stands for Packet Internet Groper.  No one really understands what this means, but the name is in common usage because of its similarity to the way ships detect the presence of submarines in the movies.  

A PING is an Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) “echo request” followed by “echo replies” coming from the destination, or target.  Device A can send a PING to device B, and device B should respond, if it is reachable from device A.

PING is the first, and most common, method of troubleshooting whether devices using the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) can “talk” to each other.

Open CMD window:
To run PING a command window should be opened – note, there are graphical utility programs which have been written which allow a more friendly user interface – however, we will focus on the command line version, since it comes “installed” with most TCP/IP “stacks”.

In Windows, click on start, then run.  In Windows NT, XP, 2000, and 2003, enter the word “cmd” and click on OK/Start/Enter.  In Windows ’95 and ’98 type the word “command” and click on OK/Start/Enter.

 
Usage:
The following is from entering the PING help.

C:\WINDOWS>ping /?

Usage: ping [-t] [-a] [-n count] [-l size] [-f] [-i TTL] [-v TOS]
            [-r count] [-s count] [[-j host-list] | [-k host-list]]
            [-w timeout] target_name

Options:
    -t             Ping the specified host until stopped.
                   To see statistics and continue - type Control-Break;
                   To stop - type Control-C.
    -a             Resolve addresses to hostnames.
    -n count       Number of echo requests to send.
    -l size        Send buffer size.
    -f             Set Don't Fragment flag in packet.
    -i TTL         Time To Live.
    -v TOS         Type Of Service.
    -r count       Record route for count hops.
    -s count       Timestamp for count hops.
    -j host-list   Loose source route along host-list.
    -k host-list   Strict source route along host-list.
    -w timeout     Timeout in milliseconds to wait for each reply.


Determine if TCP/IP stack working correctly:
At a command line (looks like: c:\ or something similar in a command window) type:
Ping 127.1.0.1
This command will return results like:

C:\WINDOWS>ping 127.1.0.1

Pinging 127.1.0.1 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 127.1.0.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
This indicates the TCP/IP stack is working correctly.  If you don’t see these results, please see the How to reset Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in Windows XP section.

 
Determine if Network Interface Card (NIC) stack working correctly:
If your IP address is something similar to 192.168.0.10 (it can be any number less than or equal to 255) then try pinging your IP address.

C:\WINDOWS>ping 192.168.0.10

Pinging 192.168.0.10 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.0.10: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.10: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.10: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.10: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 192.168.0.10:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
This indicates the NIC is working correctly.  If you don’t see these results, please see the How to reset Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in Windows XP section.  If resetting TCP/IP doesn’t work, you may have a hardware issue with the NIC.

First, make sure you have the latest driver.  If that does not work, make sure you cannot fix the problem by swapping network cable(s) and possibly ports on network equipment.  If all else fails, reinstall or replace NIC.

Determine if your device can “see” the default gateway (or other device on the network):
If your default gateway is something similar to 192.168.0.1 (it can be any number less than or equal to 255) then try pinging your default gateway.  Note, if you know the IP address of another device on your network – such as another PC or server – you can try pinging that too, it’s just that if you’re going to connect to the Internet or another network, you must be able to reach your default gateway.

C:\WINDOWS>ping 192.168.0.1

Pinging 192.168.0.10 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.0.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 192.168.0.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
If you cannot ping a device, or the default gateway, but you CAN ping other devices on the same network, then check the device you cannot ping.  
Note, many software firewalls and network equipment may be configured NOT to respond to ping.

Determine if your device can perform name resolution:
Ping a website on the Internet.  Ping a well known site, with the expertise to stay up and is a professional site that isn’t going anywhere.  An example is Cisco’s website.

C:\WINDOWS>ping www.cisco.com

Pinging www.cisco.com [198.133.219.25] with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 198.133.219.25: bytes=32 time=76ms TTL=241
Reply from 198.133.219.25: bytes=32 time=76ms TTL=241
Reply from 198.133.219.25: bytes=32 time=85ms TTL=241
Reply from 198.133.219.25: bytes=32 time=80ms TTL=241

Ping statistics for 198.133.219.25:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 76ms, Maximum = 85ms, Average = 79ms

If you cannot ping a website by name, pick another website which should be up, such as www.yahoo.com or www.google.com.  If the name does not change to an IP address, check your DNS configuration.  If your DNS configuration looks good, contact your Internet Service Provider (ISP) or IT Department.


 
Ping a site on the Internet:
Ping a website on the Internet by its IP address.  Ping a well known site, with the expertise to stay up and is a professional site that isn’t going anywhere.  An example is Cisco’s website.

C:\WINDOWS>ping 198.133.219.25

Pinging 198.133.219.25 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 198.133.219.25: bytes=32 time=76ms TTL=241
Reply from 198.133.219.25: bytes=32 time=76ms TTL=241
Reply from 198.133.219.25: bytes=32 time=77ms TTL=241
Reply from 198.133.219.25: bytes=32 time=76ms TTL=241

Ping statistics for 198.133.219.25:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 76ms, Maximum = 77ms, Average = 76ms

If you cannot ping a website by IP address, pick another website which should be up, such as www.yahoo.com 216.109.117.110 or www.google.com 64.233.161.104.  If you are unable to ping these sites, but you can ping your gateway, contact your Internet Service Provider (ISP) or your IT department.


Trace Route
Trace route is very similar to PING except it shows “hops” through routers.  Trace route is a clever use of ICMP.  

Note, like PING, some equipment can be configured not to respond to Trace route or not to allow trace route to pass beyond it.  It may be entirely possible to PING something but not do a complete trace route to it.

Trace route has different commands in different implementations of TCP/IP.  In Windows XP, the command is “tracert”.

C:\WINDOWS>tracert www.yahoo.com

Tracing route to www.yahoo.akadns.net [216.109.118.65]
over a maximum of 30 hops:

  1     6 ms    <1 ms     1 ms  deviceA.mycompany.com [x.x.x.x]
  2     1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  deviceB.mycompany.com [x.x.x.x]
  3     2 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  deviceC.mycompany.com [x.x.x.x]
  4     4 ms     1 ms     1 ms  deviceA.myprovider.net x.x.x.x
  5     2 ms     1 ms     1 ms  device B.myprovider.net [x.x.x.x]
  6    11 ms    10 ms    19 ms  core-01-so-0-0-0-0.myprovider.net [x.x.x.x]
  7    10 ms    11 ms    10 ms  x.x.x.x
  8    10 ms    11 ms    17 ms  g2-12-bas2.dce.yahoo.com [206.223.115.2]
  9    15 ms    11 ms    11 ms  vlan221-msr2.dcn.yahoo.com [216.115.96.167]
 10    16 ms    13 ms    10 ms  vl32.bas1-m.dcn.yahoo.com [216.109.120.150]
 11    12 ms    16 ms    16 ms  p2.www.dcn.yahoo.com [216.109.118.65]
(real IP’s have been replaced with x.x.x.x to protect the security of my network)
The following articles are from Microsoft.com.  All of the headings, summary, symptoms, and summary information are from Microsoft, Inc. and were downloaded 7/19/2004 from http://www.microsoft.com or other portions of its website, as indicated by the hyperlinks.
 How to troubleshoot network connectivity problems
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=325487
SUMMARY
This article describes ways to troubleshoot network connectivity problems.
MORE INFORMATION
Network connectivity problems have various causes but typically occur because of incorrect network adapters, incorrect switch settings, faulty hardware, or driver issues. Some connectivity symptoms are intermittent and do not clearly point to any one of these causes.

Sometimes an operating system upgrade introduces network connectivity problems. The same network adapter that worked correctly on an earlier or different operating system, such as Microsoft Windows 98 or Microsoft Windows 95, may cause problems after an upgrade. Sometimes a server relocation introduces a connectivity problem.

The most common causes for connectivity problems are:
       Network adapters and switch ports have mismatching duplex levels or transfer speed settings.
       Network adapters or switches with transmission rates of 10/100 megabits per second (Mbps) do not switch over correctly. Some auto sense settings may not correctly detect the speed of some network adapters.
       The network adapter is incompatible with the motherboard or other hardware or software components and drivers.
Typical error messages include the following:
Error 55: "The specified network resource is no longer available" (ERROR_DEV_NOT_EXIST).

Error 64: "The specified network name is no longer available" (ERROR_NETNAME_DELETED).

Error 121: "The semaphore timeout period has expired" (ERROR_SEM_TIMEOUT).

Error 1231: "The remote network is not reachable by the transport" (ERROR_NETWORK_UNREACHABLE).
 
How to troubleshoot TCP/IP connectivity with Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=314067
INTRODUCTION
There are tools that can provide useful information when you are trying to determine the cause of TCP/IP networking problems under Microsoft Windows XP. This article lists recommendations for using these tools to diagnose network problems. Although this list is not complete, the list does provide examples that show how you can use these tools to track down problems on the network.

OR

How to Troubleshoot TCP/IP Connectivity with Windows 2000 or Windows NT
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=102908
SUMMARY
The ARP, PING, FTP, NETSTAT, and NBTSTAT utilities can provide useful information when you are trying to determine the cause of TCP/IP networking problems with Windows. Below is a list of possible TCP/IP symptoms with recommendations for using these utilities to diagnose the problems. Although this is not a complete list, these are examples of how you might use these utilities to track down problems on the network.
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Author Comment

by:SherryG
ID: 11726440
I ran through these tests and all appears well.  Passed all Ping tests.  Ran the Network Diagnostics and all passed.  This is very perplexing.  

One other note...the motherboard on this machine was just swapped out a few days ago. Prior to and just after the swap, this machine was part of our domain.  Just yesterday we removed it from the domain and joined it to the workgroup???
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Expert Comment

by:pseudocyber
ID: 11727059
You said you CANNOT ping it right?  Can other working PC's ping it?  Is it on the same IP network (subnet) - Are the IP's near each other and the subnet masks the same - are the default gateway's the same?
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Author Comment

by:SherryG
ID: 11727215
Problem resolved.  Turns out that NetBios was not installed.  Although...I was told XP did not require NetBios.  Thanks for your suggestions.
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Accepted Solution

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pseudocyber earned 100 total points
ID: 11727272
You're right, NetBios isn't required.  But, it's a quick and easy way to network machines on the same ethernet segment.  Glad to hear you got it resolved.
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