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FDISK need to partition existing drive

Posted on 2004-08-06
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
Windows 98 has detected that drive C does not contain a valid FAT or FAT32 partition. How do I fix w/o wiping out all my data? The drive at issue has 100GB worth of data and I would like to keep my loses to a minimum if possible.
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Question by:Alfred_63
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18 Comments
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:tosh9iii
ID: 11740062
Is the drive still locked?

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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:tosh9iii
ID: 11740073
Sorry, you already mentioned that it's okay on your other posting.
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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:tosh9iii
ID: 11740082
When you used the Windows 98 boot disk, were you able to see the files?

In other words, could you access your drive thru MS Dos?
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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:tosh9iii
ID: 11740109
Windows 98 doesn't use NTFS right...?

But Windows XP does, and that's what you had installed on your other hard drive (drive C), and I'm assuming that you originally had your "Drive D" converted to NTFS.


Maybe if you set things up the way they were before, it might be allright.

Drive C (Windows XP)= Master
Drive D = Slave
0
 

Author Comment

by:Alfred_63
ID: 11740172
1. The status of the drive is the same, but locked? That is what WD diagnostic reports.
2. When I used the boot disk, I wasn't able to access the drive: Windows 98 has detected that drive C does not contain a valid FAT or FAT32 partition.
3. Sorry, you lost me on your 3:38 post.
4. My reading of the Windows 98 report is that I have to partition the drive if I want it to work again.

Thoughts.
0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:tosh9iii
ID: 11740577
Windows 98 uses Fat32
Windows XP uses NTFS

Windows 98 cannot access NTFS formatted drives, I think....

I'm not totally sure about this, but if you upgraded from Windows 98 to Windows XP then you might be able to access the drive.  

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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:shad0_cheng
ID: 11740892
Try this NTFS Driver for Win98
(http://www.sysinternals.com/ntw2k/freeware/ntfswin98.shtml for full instruction)

http://www.sysinternals.com/files/ntfs98ro.exe

Installation
Before you run the NTFS for Windows 98 installation program, you must have access to a number of files (listed below) from the Windows NT/2000/XP installation you use to access your NTFS drives. This means that if the files are located on a NTFS drive you will have to copy them to a FAT drive accessible from Windows 98.

During the NTFS for Windows 98 setup procedure you will be prompted for the location of these files. You may specify either the system directory of a Windows NT/2000/XP installation (e.g. c:\winnt), or a directory into which you've copied the necessary files. The files that you must make available to NTFS for Windows 98 are:
NTFS.SYS: this file is located at \system32\drivers\ntfs.sys
NTOSKRNL.EXE: this file is located at \system32\ntoskrnl.exe
AUTOCHK.EXE: this file is located at \system32\autochk.exe
NTDLL.DLL: this file is located at \system32\ntdll.dll
C_437.NLS: this file is located at \system32\c_437.nls
C_1252.NLS: this file is located at \system32\c_1252.nls
L_INTL.NLS: this file is located at \system32\l_intl.nls
<winnt> designates the system directory of the Windows NT/2000/XP installation that contains the NTFS driver you normally use to access your NTFS drives.

The setup procedure allows you to assign drive letters to NTFS drives that NTFS for Windows 98 mounts. Simply enter a string in the drive-letter selection entry that designates, in order, the drive letters for NTFS for Windows 98 to assign. For example, if you want the first NTFS drive mounted to have a drive letter of 'D' and the second to have a drive letter of 'T', you would enter "dt" (without the quotation marks). Note that the entry is case-insensitive. Leaving the entry blank has NTFS for Windows 98 assign the first available drive letter to each mounted NTFS drive.

After the setup procedure is complete you are prompted to reboot your computer. The next time you boot the Windows 95 or 98 system on which you installed NTFS for Windows 98 you will have access to your computer's NTFS volumes. You may rerun the configuration utility at any time to select different drive letters or a different NTFS file.
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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:shad0_cheng
ID: 11740902
To install windows 98 on this drive however, you'll need to use something like Partition Magic to setup a Fat32 partition, 2GB should be plenty for starter.
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Author Comment

by:Alfred_63
ID: 11741387
Partition Magic: PTEDIT32
ERROR
Error reading MBR at the specified sector

Unless someone has a cure, I'm toast.
0
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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:shad0_cheng
ID: 11741478
OK, here are a bunch of tools that will tell you what you have in your MBR(http://www.geocities.com/thestarman3/asm/mbr/BootToolsRefs.htm) but you never need to use them unless you really know what you are doing or you just want to try your luck.

Now was this drive working before? What OS did you have on it, basically I need a bit more info to help, I thought from the first few posts that you have a drive with NTFS partition that you would like to install Win 98 on.
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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:tosh9iii
ID: 11741818
Allow me  to explain this to shad0 cheng, okay Alfred...
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Storage/Q_21082949.html

Alfred has Western Digital Information: Model No.: WD1200JB-32EVA0 Hard Drive, it's a "slave" drive w/ 100 gb of info.  One day it said that it was locked, Error 220, and he was unable to access it.  He tried this and that but nothing worked.  Then one day he got some advice from us as well as from the people at Sony and was able to Unlock the hard drive by hooking it up as the master drive and booting up in ms dos using a Windows 98 boot disk and typed "Unlock C:"

So now the drive is unlocked.

Now on to the next problem.  When Alfred tries to access the drive it says the drive doesn't contain a valid FAT or FAT32 partition.

And that's where he is now.


0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:tosh9iii
ID: 11741832
Alfred, did you install Windows 98 on your "Model No.: WD1200JB-32EVA0" hard drive?

Or did you mean that after you booted up in ms dos with the windows 98 boot disk that you weren't able to access the drive?

Bottom line, set everything up the way it was BEFORE you had this problem.
0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:tosh9iii
ID: 11741853
DOS NTFS boot disk to access NTFS partitions in Windows XP 2000 or NT:

http://ntfs.com/boot-disk.htm
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Author Comment

by:Alfred_63
ID: 11743026
Let me clairfy:
1. Correct: Western Digital Information: Model No.: WD1200JB-32EVA0 Hard Drive, it's a "slave" drive w/ 100 gb of ifno
2. Per Tosh, booted up in ms dos with the windows 98 boot disk.
3. Unlock-Lock doesn't work.
4. Western Digital Data Lifeguard Tools still reports 220 Error Locked Drive.
5. When I used the boot disk, I wasn't able to access the drive: Windows 98 has detected that drive C does not contain a valid FAT or FAT32 partition.
6. Tried Partion Magic: Partition Magic: PTEDIT32 ERROR Error reading MBR at the specified sector.
7. Unless I can recreate the MBR w/o wiping out the drive, I'm going to have to hope to find a software to remove te data.
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LVL 4

Accepted Solution

by:
shad0_cheng earned 250 total points
ID: 11743176
Ok, I read you other post and I have a better idea of you problem, and can you try to put the drive back to your Sony as slave.
Go in the BIOS setup, make sure the Drive is detected and look for S.M.A.R.T and enable it

Bootup normally, make sure the SMART doesn't fail
Right click "my computer" -> "Manage"
under Storage -> Disk Management and tell us what you see on the slave drive (if it is there)

right click on a harddrive goto properties -> hardware -> select the slave drive -> properties -> volumes then click populate

Take down those info and post it here, and let us know if you can access the drive in Explorer or not.
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LVL 9

Assisted Solution

by:tosh9iii
tosh9iii earned 250 total points
ID: 11743482
Sorry Alfred, on the previous post when you said "WD BS re error code 220 went up in smoke" I thought you meant that the "Unlock X:" actually worked.

MBR is damaged
http://www.ntfs.com/mbr-damaged.htm

Recreate the Master Boot Record
http://www.tech-recipes.com/windows_tips44.html

Restoring the MBR
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/prkd_tro_ldau.asp
0
 

Author Comment

by:Alfred_63
ID: 11743724
Shad, I gave it a go, there is S.M.A.R.T. in AWARDBIOS.
Also, while I was away I ran partinfo which came up with some nasty results.

CauseWay DOS Extender v3.49 Copyright 1992-99 Michael Devore.
All rights reserved.

Exception: 0E, Error code: 0004

EAX=41505845 EBX=00000000 ECX=41505845 EDX=00000000 ESI=00000001
EDI=00454744 EBP=00460A80 ESP=00460A4C EIP=0043F850 EFL=00013204

CS=01A7-FFBCB000 DS=01AF-FFBCB000 ES=01AF-FFBCB000
FS=0000-xxxxxxxx GS=01B7-xxxxxxxx SS=01AF-FFBCB000

CR0=00000000 CR2=00000000 CR3=00000000 TR=0000

Info flags=00008040

Writing CW.ERR file....

CauseWay error 09 : Unrecoverable exception. Program terminated.

Also, this is a huge log from DPSCAN which by passed the MBR, more nastiness. Unless the drive is truly locked, I'm screwed.

128/0:01/LOG> ### LOG START ###
128/0:01/LOG> DPSCAN 1.1.200
128/0:01/LOG> (C) 2000-2004, DIY DataRecovery.nl
128/0:01/LOG> Contact info: HTTP://www.DIYDataRecovery.nl
128/0:01/LOG> MemFree: 438Kb
128/0:01/LOG> LogDate: 08-07-2004
128/0:01/13H> Ext13H installed test requested
128/0:01/13H> Disk found at 128
128/0:01/13H> Ext13H version: 2.1 / EDD-1.1
128/0:01/13H> Ext13H Support: Extended disk access functions
128/0:01/13H> Ext13H Support: Enhanced disk drive functions
128/0:01/13H> Ext13H tested ok
128/0:01/FDL> DiskList requested
128/0:01/FDL> Disk found at 128
128/0:01/LOG> Dump DiskList requested
### DISKLIST.ARRAY ###
__D_|________LBA_|___H_|__S_|__GB
128 | .234441648 | 255 | 63 | 111
..0 | .........0 | ..0 | .0 | ..0
..0 | .........0 | ..0 | .0 | ..0
..0 | .........0 | ..0 | .0 | ..0
 
128/0:01/VEC> Start Verify EPBR Chain for disk 0 (128)
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 0 (0 0 1) (0%), c=1, t=2
128/0:01/VEC> Could not read MBR from disk 0 (128)
128/0:01/LOG> Dump MBR requested
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 0 (0 0 1) (0%), c=2, t=2
128/0:01/LOG> !- Sector 0 on disk 128 not read
128/0:01/SCN> DiskScan requested
128/0:01/SCN> DiskScan 0 (0 0 1) / 234441647 (14593 80 63) / 234441648
128/0:01/SCN> First bunnyhop BS at 63 (0 1 1)
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 0 (0 0 1) (0%), c=3, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 1 (0 0 2) (0%), c=4, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 2 (0 0 3) (0%), c=5, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 3 (0 0 4) (0%), c=6, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 4 (0 0 5) (0%), c=7, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 5 (0 0 6) (0%), c=8, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 6 (0 0 7) (0%), c=9, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 7 (0 0 8) (0%), c=10, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 8 (0 0 9) (0%), c=11, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 9 (0 0 10) (0%), c=12, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 10 (0 0 11) (0%), c=13, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 11 (0 0 12) (0%), c=14, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 12 (0 0 13) (0%), c=15, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 13 (0 0 14) (0%), c=16, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 14 (0 0 15) (0%), c=17, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 15 (0 0 16) (0%), c=18, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16 (0 0 17) (0%), c=19, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 17 (0 0 18) (0%), c=20, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 18 (0 0 19) (0%), c=21, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 19 (0 0 20) (0%), c=22, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 20 (0 0 21) (0%), c=23, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 21 (0 0 22) (0%), c=24, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 22 (0 0 23) (0%), c=25, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 23 (0 0 24) (0%), c=26, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 24 (0 0 25) (0%), c=27, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 25 (0 0 26) (0%), c=28, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 26 (0 0 27) (0%), c=29, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 27 (0 0 28) (0%), c=30, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 28 (0 0 29) (0%), c=31, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 29 (0 0 30) (0%), c=32, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 30 (0 0 31) (0%), c=33, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 31 (0 0 32) (0%), c=34, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 32 (0 0 33) (0%), c=35, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 33 (0 0 34) (0%), c=36, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 34 (0 0 35) (0%), c=37, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 35 (0 0 36) (0%), c=38, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 36 (0 0 37) (0%), c=39, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 37 (0 0 38) (0%), c=40, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 38 (0 0 39) (0%), c=41, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 39 (0 0 40) (0%), c=42, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 40 (0 0 41) (0%), c=43, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 41 (0 0 42) (0%), c=44, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 42 (0 0 43) (0%), c=45, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 43 (0 0 44) (0%), c=46, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 44 (0 0 45) (0%), c=47, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 45 (0 0 46) (0%), c=48, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 46 (0 0 47) (0%), c=49, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 47 (0 0 48) (0%), c=50, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 48 (0 0 49) (0%), c=51, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 49 (0 0 50) (0%), c=52, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 50 (0 0 51) (0%), c=53, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 51 (0 0 52) (0%), c=54, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 52 (0 0 53) (0%), c=55, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 53 (0 0 54) (0%), c=56, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 54 (0 0 55) (0%), c=57, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 55 (0 0 56) (0%), c=58, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 56 (0 0 57) (0%), c=59, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 57 (0 0 58) (0%), c=60, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 58 (0 0 59) (0%), c=61, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 59 (0 0 60) (0%), c=62, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 60 (0 0 61) (0%), c=63, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 61 (0 0 62) (0%), c=64, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 62 (0 0 63) (0%), c=65, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 63 (0 1 1) (0%), c=66, t=2
128/0:01/SCN> Next bunnyhop BS at 63 (0 1 1)
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 63 (0 1 1) (0%), c=67, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 64 (0 1 2) (0%), c=68, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 65 (0 1 3) (0%), c=69, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 66 (0 1 4) (0%), c=70, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 67 (0 1 5) (0%), c=71, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 68 (0 1 6) (0%), c=72, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 69 (0 1 7) (0%), c=73, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 70 (0 1 8) (0%), c=74, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 71 (0 1 9) (0%), c=75, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 72 (0 1 10) (0%), c=76, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 73 (0 1 11) (0%), c=77, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 74 (0 1 12) (0%), c=78, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 75 (0 1 13) (0%), c=79, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 76 (0 1 14) (0%), c=80, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 77 (0 1 15) (0%), c=81, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 78 (0 1 16) (0%), c=82, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 79 (0 1 17) (0%), c=83, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 80 (0 1 18) (0%), c=84, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 81 (0 1 19) (0%), c=85, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 82 (0 1 20) (0%), c=86, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 83 (0 1 21) (0%), c=87, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 84 (0 1 22) (0%), c=88, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 85 (0 1 23) (0%), c=89, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 86 (0 1 24) (0%), c=90, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 87 (0 1 25) (0%), c=91, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 88 (0 1 26) (0%), c=92, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 89 (0 1 27) (0%), c=93, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 90 (0 1 28) (0%), c=94, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 91 (0 1 29) (0%), c=95, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 92 (0 1 30) (0%), c=96, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 93 (0 1 31) (0%), c=97, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 94 (0 1 32) (0%), c=98, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 95 (0 1 33) (0%), c=99, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 96 (0 1 34) (0%), c=100, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 97 (0 1 35) (0%), c=101, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 98 (0 1 36) (0%), c=102, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 99 (0 1 37) (0%), c=103, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 100 (0 1 38) (0%), c=104, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 101 (0 1 39) (0%), c=105, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 102 (0 1 40) (0%), c=106, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 103 (0 1 41) (0%), c=107, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 104 (0 1 42) (0%), c=108, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 105 (0 1 43) (0%), c=109, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 106 (0 1 44) (0%), c=110, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 107 (0 1 45) (0%), c=111, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 108 (0 1 46) (0%), c=112, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 109 (0 1 47) (0%), c=113, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 110 (0 1 48) (0%), c=114, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 111 (0 1 49) (0%), c=115, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 112 (0 1 50) (0%), c=116, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 113 (0 1 51) (0%), c=117, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 114 (0 1 52) (0%), c=118, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 115 (0 1 53) (0%), c=119, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 116 (0 1 54) (0%), c=120, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 117 (0 1 55) (0%), c=121, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 118 (0 1 56) (0%), c=122, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 119 (0 1 57) (0%), c=123, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 120 (0 1 58) (0%), c=124, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 121 (0 1 59) (0%), c=125, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 122 (0 1 60) (0%), c=126, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 123 (0 1 61) (0%), c=127, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 124 (0 1 62) (0%), c=128, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 125 (0 1 63) (0%), c=129, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16064 (0 254 63) (0%), c=130, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16065 (1 0 1) (0%), c=131, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16066 (1 0 2) (0%), c=132, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16067 (1 0 3) (0%), c=133, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16068 (1 0 4) (0%), c=134, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16069 (1 0 5) (0%), c=135, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16070 (1 0 6) (0%), c=136, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16071 (1 0 7) (0%), c=137, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16072 (1 0 8) (0%), c=138, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16073 (1 0 9) (0%), c=139, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16074 (1 0 10) (0%), c=140, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16075 (1 0 11) (0%), c=141, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16076 (1 0 12) (0%), c=142, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16077 (1 0 13) (0%), c=143, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16078 (1 0 14) (0%), c=144, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16079 (1 0 15) (0%), c=145, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16080 (1 0 16) (0%), c=146, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16081 (1 0 17) (0%), c=147, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16082 (1 0 18) (0%), c=148, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16083 (1 0 19) (0%), c=149, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16084 (1 0 20) (0%), c=150, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16085 (1 0 21) (0%), c=151, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16086 (1 0 22) (0%), c=152, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16087 (1 0 23) (0%), c=153, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16088 (1 0 24) (0%), c=154, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16089 (1 0 25) (0%), c=155, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16090 (1 0 26) (0%), c=156, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16091 (1 0 27) (0%), c=157, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16092 (1 0 28) (0%), c=158, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16093 (1 0 29) (0%), c=159, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16094 (1 0 30) (0%), c=160, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16095 (1 0 31) (0%), c=161, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16096 (1 0 32) (0%), c=162, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16097 (1 0 33) (0%), c=163, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16098 (1 0 34) (0%), c=164, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16099 (1 0 35) (0%), c=165, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16100 (1 0 36) (0%), c=166, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16101 (1 0 37) (0%), c=167, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16102 (1 0 38) (0%), c=168, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16103 (1 0 39) (0%), c=169, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16104 (1 0 40) (0%), c=170, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16105 (1 0 41) (0%), c=171, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16106 (1 0 42) (0%), c=172, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16107 (1 0 43) (0%), c=173, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16108 (1 0 44) (0%), c=174, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16109 (1 0 45) (0%), c=175, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16110 (1 0 46) (0%), c=176, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16111 (1 0 47) (0%), c=177, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16112 (1 0 48) (0%), c=178, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16113 (1 0 49) (0%), c=179, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16114 (1 0 50) (0%), c=180, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16115 (1 0 51) (0%), c=181, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16116 (1 0 52) (0%), c=182, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16117 (1 0 53) (0%), c=183, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16118 (1 0 54) (0%), c=184, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16119 (1 0 55) (0%), c=185, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16120 (1 0 56) (0%), c=186, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16121 (1 0 57) (0%), c=187, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16122 (1 0 58) (0%), c=188, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16123 (1 0 59) (0%), c=189, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16124 (1 0 60) (0%), c=190, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16125 (1 0 61) (0%), c=191, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16126 (1 0 62) (0%), c=192, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16127 (1 0 63) (0%), c=193, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16128 (1 1 1) (0%), c=194, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16129 (1 1 2) (0%), c=195, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16130 (1 1 3) (0%), c=196, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16131 (1 1 4) (0%), c=197, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16132 (1 1 5) (0%), c=198, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16133 (1 1 6) (0%), c=199, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16134 (1 1 7) (0%), c=200, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16135 (1 1 8) (0%), c=201, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16136 (1 1 9) (0%), c=202, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16137 (1 1 10) (0%), c=203, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16138 (1 1 11) (0%), c=204, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16139 (1 1 12) (0%), c=205, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16140 (1 1 13) (0%), c=206, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16141 (1 1 14) (0%), c=207, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16142 (1 1 15) (0%), c=208, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16143 (1 1 16) (0%), c=209, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16144 (1 1 17) (0%), c=210, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16145 (1 1 18) (0%), c=211, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16146 (1 1 19) (0%), c=212, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16147 (1 1 20) (0%), c=213, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16148 (1 1 21) (0%), c=214, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16149 (1 1 22) (0%), c=215, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16150 (1 1 23) (0%), c=216, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16151 (1 1 24) (0%), c=217, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16152 (1 1 25) (0%), c=218, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16153 (1 1 26) (0%), c=219, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16154 (1 1 27) (0%), c=220, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16155 (1 1 28) (0%), c=221, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16156 (1 1 29) (0%), c=222, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16157 (1 1 30) (0%), c=223, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16158 (1 1 31) (0%), c=224, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16159 (1 1 32) (0%), c=225, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16160 (1 1 33) (0%), c=226, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16161 (1 1 34) (0%), c=227, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16162 (1 1 35) (0%), c=228, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16163 (1 1 36) (0%), c=229, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16164 (1 1 37) (0%), c=230, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16165 (1 1 38) (0%), c=231, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16166 (1 1 39) (0%), c=232, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16167 (1 1 40) (0%), c=233, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16168 (1 1 41) (0%), c=234, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16169 (1 1 42) (0%), c=235, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16170 (1 1 43) (0%), c=236, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16171 (1 1 44) (0%), c=237, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16172 (1 1 45) (0%), c=238, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16173 (1 1 46) (0%), c=239, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16174 (1 1 47) (0%), c=240, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16175 (1 1 48) (0%), c=241, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16176 (1 1 49) (0%), c=242, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16177 (1 1 50) (0%), c=243, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16178 (1 1 51) (0%), c=244, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16179 (1 1 52) (0%), c=245, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16180 (1 1 53) (0%), c=246, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16181 (1 1 54) (0%), c=247, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16182 (1 1 55) (0%), c=248, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16183 (1 1 56) (0%), c=249, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16184 (1 1 57) (0%), c=250, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16185 (1 1 58) (0%), c=251, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16186 (1 1 59) (0%), c=252, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16187 (1 1 60) (0%), c=253, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16188 (1 1 61) (0%), c=254, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16189 (1 1 62) (0%), c=255, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> ReadError at 16190 (1 1 63) (0%), c=256, t=2
128/0:01/RDS> MaxReadErrors (256) reached, abort
128/0:01/LOG> RunTime: 0:01
128/0:01/LOG> ### CLOSE LOG ###
0
 
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Expert Comment

by:tosh9iii
ID: 11743913
Alfred, does that mean that you finally got you're computer up and running again?
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