• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 13438
  • Last Modified:

How do I set a Linux environment variable from within C/C++

Hi,

I wish to set a Linux environment variable from within GNU C/C++.

I've tried "system("var=hello"); but this doesnt work - the variable seems to disappear when I check it in a shell script.
0
Risky101
Asked:
Risky101
1 Solution
 
sunnycoderCommented:
man setenv

       #include <stdlib.h>

       int setenv(const char *name, const char *value, int overwrite);
0
 
ahoffmannCommented:
the variable seems to disappear when I check it in a shell script
you cannot set an variable from within your program which is still alive after this program exits
The only way to do this is to exit your program with any of the exec*() function, calling another program or shell
0
 
akshayxxCommented:
i would agree with ahoffmann,  env variables can be passed on to children processes, but not escalated up to parents., hence in the C program, whatever u set , will die once the program dies.. unless u exec some shell/program from there in.
0
Visualize your virtual and backup environments

Create well-organized and polished visualizations of your virtual and backup environments when planning VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V or Veeam deployments. It helps you to gain better visibility and valuable business insights.

 
Risky101Author Commented:
the program 'read' (built into Bash) manages to set the environment variable properly, ie:

read yesno
if [ "$yesno" = "y" ];then
  # do something
fi

So far, I've tried:
system("yesno=\"n\");
setenv()
system ("export etc etc");
system ("declare etc etc");

Without exception, the variables disappear when the program exits. Is there any way, any at all, to set an environment variable, just like read does?

0
 
ahoffmannCommented:
>  the program 'read' (built into Bash) manages to set the environment variable properly, ie:
NO.

> Without exception, the variables disappear when the program exits.
yes, as already said.
0
 
jmcgOwnerCommented:
Environment variables are process-based. A process can only change environment variables for itself and, by inheritance, for its children.

Any invocation of 'system' creates at least one additional process. Any changes that process makes to its environment are lost when it exits and most certainly cannot effect the environment variables of the parent.

A subprocess can produce, as an output, an instruction for changing the parent's environment variable. And as you've experienced with the 'read' built-in, the shell can change its own environment variables and pass them along to its children.

So, the usual way to have a program return a value into a shell environment variable looks something like this:

result=`external-command`
export result

You can also have the program write its new settings for environment variables into a file

external-command >new-env

where the new-env file ends up looking like:

env1=value1
export env1
env2=value2
export env2

and the shell can then use the "." command to read in the new-env file to make the settings effective

. new-env

======

None of this is particular helpful if the only thing you have control over is a C/C++ program. The shell that calls your program has to cooperate if its environment variables are to be changed.
0

Featured Post

What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now