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why 1600 mhz down to 800 mhz?

Posted on 2004-08-08
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why my AMD 64 is 1600 mhz  FSB and all the motherboards I have seen only supports up to 800mhz?? Im missing 800 mhz or what should I do
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Question by:gigolous2
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by:winzig
ID: 11748820
In CPU is L1, and L2 cache, These two features help minimize the data flow in and out of the CPU.
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by:dis1931
ID: 11748826
They are hard to find...there are not too many manufacturers but they are available....gigabyte makes one as do some other vendors

Here is one of them
GIGABYTE GA-K8VT800M

http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=13-128-203&depa=1

Dis
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by:CoolATIGuy
ID: 11748835
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by:Gaud-wo
ID: 11748919
Quite few mainboards, I'd wait till I get the mainboard that fits my needs - or you would have to like one of these.

Do note that there is a difference between ATX and Micro ATX (the latter misses 2 PCI slots, and sometimes a few functions - as it's smaller...)

Glenn
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by:tosh9iii
ID: 11749380
First of all, you said that your motherboard has a FSB of 1600 mghz (1.6 ghz), and that other motherboards mainly have a fsb of 800 mghz.  You're not "missing" 800 mghz, you have an extra 800 mghz.  And you ask what you should do about it.  Basically, you should take advantage of your fast motherboard.

I apologize if I misunderstood your question
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by:dis1931
ID: 11751523
He was saying that his AMD 64 ( meaning procesor) has a 1600MHZ bus...such as a P4 Hyperthreaded has an 800MHZ bus...while most motherboards even those made for the AMD64 only have a 800mhz FSB rather than using the 1600MHZ FSB.
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by:gigolous2
ID: 11755353
I using at MSI neo platinun nforce 3 250 with 800 mhz FSB, with a 3400+ AMD 64 1 mb cache 1600 mhz FSB, the question is why the MB only supports up to 800mhz only instead of 1.6 ghz? or is like 800 mhz w/out HT and 1600 with it? Im trying to understand why.
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by:gigolous2
ID: 11755639
well I spoke to tech support with MSI and they told me is a 800mhz fsb CPU bi-directional means two way 800 mhz FSB, still don't understand but well, can anyone explain me that in english please =)
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by:dis1931
ID: 11755642
It is simply the motherboard.  There are some that do support it and some that don't.  More of them will come out as the demand for them increases.  I'm sure cost for the motherboard manufacturers is an issue.  Why this board doesn't support it?  Because the manufacturer didn't build it that way.  You will have to upgrade to a different MB if you want to take full advantage of the 1600mhz bus.
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by:winzig
ID: 11756421
gigolous:As i mentioned in first ansver the request for data taransfer from memory to CPU is reduced to by L1 and L2 chache, Bi directional means that data are transfered when the clock signal goes from from H>L and from L>H.
The interpretation of L and H depend on architecture detail can be found in AMD data sheets  but because the core voltage is 3.3V the LOW will be probably defined as L<1.6 and H>1,6V (in real definition of H and L is more complex)
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by:winzig
ID: 11756443
here is artile where it is explained.
http://www.ocfaq.com/article.php/overclocking/62
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by:gigolous2
ID: 11758153
but thats memory ddr vs sdr and not FSB
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by:winzig
ID: 11760503
but the technique is the same, required bandwith of FSB - which is about X times higher than frequency of CPU - so the question should by, why the FSB frequency isn't 10Ghz.

The memory bandwidth is reduced by L1, and l2 cache and on bus is uused this technique which increase throughput of BUS. And the reason why the FSB isn't higher is that is nearly imposible create Cooper which can handle so hight frequency. On this MB you have to calculated with speed of light because in case that there is litle bit longer wire signal is  delayed (lenght of tha wave on f=800Mgz is 37cm when the lambda=epsilon ) and on such high frequencies is on wire which is 37cm length (size of the MB) on the  start  of the wire is  H(3V) in dhe midle of MB L(0V) and on end  H(3V) in one moment!!!
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by:dis1931
ID: 11761508
Or rather than concern yourself you could buy a motherboard that has a 1600MHZ FSB.
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by:Gaud-wo
ID: 11762329
winzig - do you expect most people here to understand that?

I doubt that people without electromechanical education know what frequency is exactly, and that it can be represented as waves and that waves have lengths in centimetres.
So, if you want to help, you explain it in a matter that the one who posed the question can understand - you don't go 'bragging' knowledge electronica, this is not what a forum is about, imho.

If you want to explain what you mean by all that, I'd be more than happy to listen - I wonder why L1 and L2 occupies the memory bus, I thought the one was integrated in processor and the other had it's separate bus?

Do you have any flowcharts of this?

What I think MSI meant by their explanation, is something like 'full duplex' - that means the traffic isn't one-way but bi-directional. This should mean that your mainboard is 800Mhz bi-directional (both transferring and receiving), and your processor this is 1600Mhz.

This is like winzig said about DDR Ram as opposed to SDR Ram - how is DDR faster? Because it sends data twice as fast, on EACH 'clock tick' in stead of on each other 'clock tick'. So the ram just got a bit different standard and controller, doubling the performance (theoretically, of course - depends on other variables too). Somewhat same principe in your CPU perhaps...

I'll search a link on this when I get home!
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DoTheDEW335 earned 500 total points
ID: 11762827
>>well I spoke to tech support with MSI and they told me is a 800mhz fsb CPU bi-directional means two way 800 mhz FSB, still >>don't understand but well, can anyone explain me that in english please =)

Gig,
I found this:

HyperTransport communications — HyperTransport is the glue that makes AMD's reorg of the traditional PC work. A packet-based chip-to-chip interconnect, HyperTransport links are pairs of 8-bit or 16-bit unidirectional links running at speeds up to 800MHz. Throw in a little DDR action, sending data twice per clock cycle, and you have an effective clock rate of 1.6GHz per link. As implemented in Hammer, HyperTransport links have a maximum throughput of 6.4GB/s (16 bits upstream plus 16 bits downstream at an effective 1.6GHz).

Hammer systems use HyperTransport for several things. In all Hammer systems, one of the CPUs (or the only CPU) talks to the rest of the system over a HyperTransport link. Traditional chipset services like AGP, PCI, and south bridge I/O are delivered over this link much like VPN tunnels are delivered over TCP/IP connections in a computer network. Done right, HyperTransport should simplify motherboard design by replacing slower and wider connections that require more traces to achieve similar results. In multiprocessor implementations, HyperTransport links between processors allow for inter-chip communications, as well.

Source: http://www.tech-report.com/reviews/2003q3/athlon64/index.x?pg=1
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by:Gaud-wo
ID: 11770799
Now the question is if the processor can use these HyperTransport lanes to go up to 1600Mhz...

I think they had to start this hypertransport technology already quite a while ago, it's simple, logical and fast. Could mean a lot for systems with crowded PCI bus (one PCI ATA (or S-ATA) controller, a gigabit network card, and a video card alltogether in PCI can cause quite a bottleneck!

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by:dis1931
ID: 11771750
GIGABYTE "GA-K8NS PRO"
FOXCONN "755A01-6EKRS"
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by:gigolous2
ID: 11797937
now I understand, so basically HT does the work to be at 1.6ghz but 2-way, 800 up and down...! hmm god I need windows xp 64 bit =)
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