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Filtering a list for the IP

Posted on 2004-08-08
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
I have the grep output;
#grep -nr '10.0.0.84' *
zones9/25/mydomain.tld:11:*   86400 IN A 10.0.0.84  ;Cl=2

I want the IP from that line - using a shell script.

Thanks alot
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Question by:MAVERICK
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Expert Comment

by:sunnycoder
ID: 11750297
Hi MAVERICK,

grep x.x.x.x | sed 's/.* IN A \([^\.]*\.[^\.]*\.[^\.]*\.[^ ]*\).*/\1/'

Sunnycoder
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Accepted Solution

by:
yuzh earned 400 total points
ID: 11750310
Here's an example script

#!/bin/ksh
LINE="zones9/25/mydomain.tld:11:*   86400 IN A 10.0.0.84  ;Cl=2"
IP=`echo $LINE | awk '{print $5}' `
echo " the IP is $IP "
exit



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by:ahoffmann
ID: 11754012
hmm, yuzh's suggestion misses the matching part, I'd use:

awk '($5=="10.0.0.84"){print $5;exit;}' *

# feel free to improve in many ways ;-)
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Author Comment

by:MAVERICK
ID: 11754872
Sunnycoder: I was unable to get your suggestion to run
yuzh: your suggestion solved the immediate question
ahoffmann: I'm not particularly familiar with awk, but i'd love be :) This was a small part of a larger question

There is a follow-on question posted here;
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/Unix/Q_21087259.html

Thanks
Maverick
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Expert Comment

by:Tintin
ID: 11757518
You don't need the -n flag on grep as you're not using the output from it.

grep -r '10.0.0.84' | awk '{print $5}'

If you don't need to recurse, you use ahoffmann's suggestion.
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Assisted Solution

by:Tintin
Tintin earned 200 total points
ID: 11757519
You don't need the -n flag on grep as you're not using the output from it.

grep -r '10.0.0.84' * | awk '{print $5}'

If you don't need to recurse, you use ahoffmann's suggestion.
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Expert Comment

by:yuzh
ID: 11758807
"hmm, yuzh's suggestion misses the matching part, I'd use:"

I didn't forget!, I just can't see the point to use something like:
   
grep -r '10.0.0.84' * | awk '{print $5}'

reresult would be 10.0.0.84 or nothing.

you can use:

if `grep '10.0.0.84' *` ; then
    IP="10.0.0.84"
else
    echo "No such IP!"
fi
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Assisted Solution

by:ahoffmann
ahoffmann earned 200 total points
ID: 11760478
agreed, greenly assumed that the questioner replaces the/my grep pattern by a more generic one ;-)
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Author Comment

by:MAVERICK
ID: 11765933
Even though matching was not really required (I was processing a list) Thanks everyone for the tips on shell scripting - something i need to learn more on ;-)

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