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Validate Users in IIS by using Active Directory Users on a different network

Quick Overview:
  We have two servers.
   - 1 IIS Server With a T1 Line
   - 1 Windows 2000 Active Directory Server on another network with a T1 Line.

These two servers ARE NOT CONNECTED in anyway except for over the internet.

Is there a way so that users can log into IIS using "Basic Authentication" with user accounts that are on the Active Directory Server?  I guess in other words - can user account information be validated over the internet?

Let me know if you need any more information!

Thanks,
Scott
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ScottFcasni
Asked:
ScottFcasni
1 Solution
 
jdeclueCommented:
User account information can be validated over the Internet. But... using Basic Authentication to IIS, is very insecure, and it becomes much worse if you capture that information and forward it to the Domain to validate and have it authorize back. If you attempted to authenticate this way, you would become an extremely easy target.
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hvdhelmCommented:
Build a VPN between them, that's secure and simpel, after you set up the vpn, you can simply use Basic Authentication like you are in a LAN.
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jdeclueCommented:
Even in that Scenario the VPN will, essentially encrypt the basic authentication between the web server and domain. But, and it is a big one, the domain, username and password will be sent in clear text between the user and the web server. If you wish to do this, here are the details.

1) First and formost, use SSL between the client and webserver (in order to encrypt the client session).
2) Configure a secure point to point connection between the web server and the Domain. In all cases the IIS server will have to be joined to the Domain.
   a) VPN tunnel between web server and domain.
   b) Point to Point via a Frame, T-1, ISDN etc.
3) The web server will need to have 2 network cards, One connected to the Internet side, and one connected to the connection to the Domain.
4) The web server, must Not be allowed to Route traffic between the interfaces.
5) Configure your security on the Internet side to only allow port 80 and 443 for SSL, when a user connects direct them to port 443 and authenticate them.

Background.

1) User connect over SSL to provide Domain\Username and password, SSL encrypts communications.
2) Web Server, connect through back-end to Domain and authenticates User.
3) If user is present in domain they are authenticated and allowed access.
4) In this configuration you are about as secure as you can be. I would consider this a minimum for your installation.

J
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tenaciumCommented:
You could also setup an AD/AM server on the IIS network.  You'd need to figure out a way to secuely replicate from AD to the ADAM server, maybe using a secure VPN as described above.  But, the auth can take place without travelling across the net in clear text.  

This is one of the reasons Microsoft introduced ADAM.  If they were on the same network, ADAM allows pass-through authentication to AD, but that's not going to work in your environment.  Nor will using IIFP to replicate, which would be ideal.  But, you could export text files from AD and use SSH to secure FTP the files to the ADAM server and import -- all with some fairly simple scripting.

It's not super-easy to set this up, but I think worth consideration.
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PakaCommented:
jdclue is correct.  This is a standard problem with Exchange Front-end/Back-end configurations.  Standard configs for Exchange installs is to setup SSL between client and front-end and use IPSec from front-end to back-end - it works like a charm.
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jdeclueCommented:
Scott, let us know how you are doing and if you have any questions regarding the above ;)

J
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jdeclueCommented:
Could you please give us an update as to the question, and/or close it please. Thank You ;)

J
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jdeclueCommented:
1081791 ... fairly elegant response ;) I believe the response answers the question as asked.

Joel
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