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EASY - Should I use an access point or a bridger?

Posted on 2004-08-09
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Last Modified: 2013-11-09
I have a simple question for somebody with more experience than me.  I have a small wired network and one network jack still available.  My problem is that the system I want to connect to it is in a room across the office (about 35 feet) and I don't want to run cable along the floor.  I would like to use an 802.11g adapter to connect the computer to my network, but I am unsure of what to use on the other end with my available jack.  Should I use a wireless access point or a wireless ethernet bridge?  Or is there a better option than either of these.  If you've had good experience with specific devices, model numbers would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!
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Question by:WhitePhantom
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by:grblades
grblades earned 75 total points
ID: 11755572
Hi WhitePhantom,
A wireless bridge is designed to connect two wired networks together. An access point is designed to allow multiple computers with wireless networks to connect to the access point and therefore the rest of the network.
In your case the access point solution is the best.
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by:grblades
ID: 11755600
The D-Link wireless access points are very good. I would go for one of their turbo 54g models and a corresponding network card as that way you will get the maximum bandwidth. The actual throughput efficiency of a wireless network is much worse than a full duplex (switched) network. A standard 54G is 54Mbps but realistically around 20Mbps is all you will get. A wired network will run at almost 95Mbps.
Therefore sticking to one manufacturer and using turbo mode and two channels simultaneously you can get over 50Mbps.
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Expert Comment

by:svikash
ID: 11755874
You could also look at the linksys turbo 54G models....go on their website and in product look at WRT54GS model.Its probably one of the most stable ones with a lot of horsepower and space in it.It also provides you with some type of QoS based on ports.Not that you need it now but if you ever decide to go VoIP this would be something already present in your router.
If you are interested in knowing more things about it let me know and I can provide you with more details about it but I would say that it is an amazing little equipment which can do a lot.
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cmsJustin earned 75 total points
ID: 11755894
If it is the only omputer you will use on the other end, just set up an access point. Linksys are pretty much standard for home installation. They are inexpensive and relatively stable.

If you are going to have a few computers on the other end, I would use a bridge. Buffalo makes a cost effective 802.11g bridge, but may be a little more difficult to setup than a linksys or dlink.

There are also home networking options that use the power or phone lines in your home to traverse traffic. Linksys make both (PowerLine & PhoneLine)

http://www.linksys.com/products/

http://www.buffalotech.com/products/wireless.php

Most wireless bridges double as access point too, incase you change your mind later on....

-Justin
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by:WhitePhantom
ID: 11756831
Thanks everyone for your help! I will be purchasing a Linksys access point to connect my wireless equipped computer to the switch.
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