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How to install g4u (Ghost 4 Unix) on a partition

Posted on 2004-08-10
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I have some win98 computers which I want to make an image of.

It works well.

But now for the tricky part:

Is it possible to take take the floppy's contents and put in a partition, so i can either boot from the g4u partition or win 98 partition. And if, how do I do it.. My Netbsd is not the best.


The second Question is:

Is it possible to make the partition or floppy disc to start på running the command, maybe uploaddisk 1.2.3.4 test.gz wd0



Kind Regards

Tue Topholm
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Question by:ttopholm
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Expert Comment

by:gheist
ID: 11766121
Since your NetBSD is not the best, this is close to impossible....
tricky)
It is possible to dd a whole floppy into new partition aside from win98 (probably shrinking win98 with tools like PartitionMagic) using "dd" command (be very careful about this command, it does not complain if you erase your disk at maximum speed)
Second Question)
You need NetBSD system for that (edit /etc/rc script within a ramdisk inside kernel on floppy)

I did almost the same using OpenBSD install floppy (which has almost all drivers in place and some 100k free in ramdisk after)

If you dislike floppy speed etc, you may write floppy image on CD as the El-Torito boot image (only possibility to avoid learning NetBSD and improve matters somehow)
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Author Comment

by:ttopholm
ID: 11766177
Oohh. It sounds hard...


But can you try to make a tutorial for me.... :-)
or step-by-step guide :-)

Even if it is allmost impossible :-)


/Tue
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Accepted Solution

by:
gheist earned 250 total points
ID: 11766700
1) Get old unused computer with netcard ( 486 with 16M of ram and 2G disk will be slow but enough, Pentium II with 64M RAM and 8G disk will be comfortable).
2) install NetBSD or OpenBSD as instructed in www.openbsd.org or www.netbsd.org 
3) make sure you get full sources installed
4) customize boot disk configurations in /usr/src/distrib
5) make your boot disks

I'd suggest OpenBSD, because default installer is on one floppy, so you can add functionality you need there, and their documentation is always complete & helpful.

Once you get past (1) i can help you further.
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