Want to win a PS4? Go Premium and enter to win our High-Tech Treats giveaway. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

Replacing Win2k Server domain question

Posted on 2004-08-10
9
Medium Priority
?
128 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-14
Hello All,

I have a network running in mixed mode and I'm getting ready to upgrade one of our main Windows 2000 servers (member server).
The servers name is FSHIFT and it's ip address is 10.10.10.243
I have already built and configured the new server.

Can I do the following...
Remove the current server from the domain, shut it down.
Start up the new server with the same name and ip address, add it to the domain so I can test to see if the new server will work properly
If it does, I'm good.... if not I will need to remove the new server from the domain, shut it down and bring the original server back up and re-join it to the domain.

Is this going to be a problem?

Do I need to remove and re-add the servers to the domain? (I'm pretty sure I do... even if they have the same name)

TIA!
0
Comment
Question by:Die-Tech
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 5
  • 4
9 Comments
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:novacopy
ID: 11765983
i would just unplug the network cable from the older server and plug it into the newer server to check it out so incase it doesnt work you can just switch the cable over
0
 
LVL 4

Author Comment

by:Die-Tech
ID: 11766087
I've done that already... but it's not a good test for me.
I'm having a problem with the SQL instances starting.... our MRP software vendor said I need to join the new server to the domain and then give the service a domain account to logon with.

I'm afraid if I join the new server to the domain and it doesn't work, I may have problems joining the original server back into the domain.

Does that make any sense?


Thanks,
Dan
0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:novacopy
ID: 11766120
just dont remove the old server from the domain. why would you do that before you test the other one anyway? if your worried about the name of the server the dns will still resolve it to the old ip address anyways.
0
Tech or Treat! - Giveaway

Submit an article about your scariest tech experience—and the solution—and you’ll be automatically entered to win one of 4 fantastic tech gadgets.

 
LVL 4

Author Comment

by:Die-Tech
ID: 11766163
How does the new server connect to the domain?  Right now it's just part of it's own workgroup.
The vendor is telling me to join the new server to the domain and then change the FSTI service to use a domain account when it starts.

0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:novacopy
ID: 11766224
that is correct, just unplug the old server, plug in new, add to domain, reboot. login

then go to start>settings>controllpanel>administrative tool>services

then find the fsti service and go to properties> click the Logon tab

choose "this account" and add the domain account you want to use for the login
0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:novacopy
ID: 11766227
then restart that service
0
 
LVL 4

Author Comment

by:Die-Tech
ID: 11766282
OK.... Let's say I do all that and the FSTI service still doesn't work properly...
I shut down the new server and unplug it from the network.
Plug the original server back into the network, will it be able to connect to the domain after I've joined the new server to the domain using the original server's machine account?  Or do I have to re-join the original server back into the domain?

Sorry if this sounds so confusing... if this wasn't a production evironment I'd already have tried it.... but since it is I have to have a plan "B"

0
 
LVL 4

Accepted Solution

by:
novacopy earned 1500 total points
ID: 11766380
"Or do I have to re-join the original server back into the domain?"

why are you taking the old server out of the domain when your just testing the new server. dont remove it unless its 100%

when you add the new server to the domain. are you naming it the same as the old one? name it something different and just make sure there is still a dns record for the old server pointing to the new server's ip address. then if everything is working 100% you can put the old server back online, remove it from the domain and shut it down and bring the new server backup and rename it to the old server's name.
0
 
LVL 4

Author Comment

by:Die-Tech
ID: 11767251
Ok... i get what you are saying now.

I was going to put the new server in place with the same name and same ip address as the old server so I could test it completely.

The vendor's software is installed with the server's name in mind.
Their suggestion was to put the new server in using the old server's name so it would be transparent to the user.
They were also saying, if I rename the server I would need to reinstall the client software on each workstation.

I tried something like this a week ago... I left the old server (FSHIFT) online, loaded all my server software (SQL, MRP, etc.) on the new server (which was named FSHIFT at the time), renamed the server to FSHIFT2 and brought it online with a different ip address and joined it to the domain.

Many of the MRP/SQL services wouldn't start on the new server... then after shutting down the new server many of the clients (scanners) couldn't connect to the old server anymore (connection timeouts).  After some research I found the WINS database had changed the ip address of FSHIFT from the old server's ip address to the new server's ip address.

0

Featured Post

Hire Technology Freelancers with Gigs

Work with freelancers specializing in everything from database administration to programming, who have proven themselves as experts in their field. Hire the best, collaborate easily, pay securely, and get projects done right.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

NTFS file system has been developed by Microsoft that is widely used by Windows NT operating system and its advanced versions. It is the mostly used over FAT file system as it provides superior features like reliability, security, storage, efficienc…
Here in this article, you will get a step by step guidance on how to restore an Exchange database to a recovery database. Get a brief on Recovery Database and how it can be used to restore Exchange database in this section!
Sometimes it takes a new vantage point, apart from our everyday security practices, to truly see our Active Directory (AD) vulnerabilities. We get used to implementing the same techniques and checking the same areas for a breach. This pattern can re…
Is your data getting by on basic protection measures? In today’s climate of debilitating malware and ransomware—like WannaCry—that may not be enough. You need to establish more than basics, like a recovery plan that protects both data and endpoints.…
Suggested Courses

636 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question