Name for file that can only grow in size

Does anyone know what the name is for a file that can only grow in size?
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Drew LakeAsked:
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Netman66Connect With a Mentor Commented:
What you are seeing is the result of "whitespace" in the file.  Most often this happens with DB-type files.

In Outlook you can COMPACT pst and ost files after removing fluff.  In Exchange this is handled with ESEUTIL - it copies the store to another location, compacts and defrags the database then you copy it back to the correct location manually and restart the Exchange services.

Files as you describe normally have a method of compaction depending on their structure.

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Pete LongTechnical ConsultantCommented:
Hi RIHD,


windows ;)


PeteL
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DVation191Commented:
heh, windows  :)
uhh i dunno, a dynamic file?
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DVation191Commented:
how about "exponential file"

oh this is no fun anymore.
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ngravattCommented:
is this some kind of riddle?

linear file maybe

expanding file

log file
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Drew LakeAuthor Commented:
It feels like a riddle to me.  Have some guy I work with preaching about these "files" that only grow in size, mentioned something about growing partition or flat file, I do not think that is right though.  The file can grow in size, but no matter what is removed from the file, the file size will never decrease.
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tmirelesCommented:
I guess it depends what kind of file you are talking about.  If you remove something from a file it should decrease in size.

Maybe it is a certain program that he is refering to that creates a file and no matter what is removed the file doesn't change in size because it is tracking the changes as well.

I just tried this with a text file and word file and copied the same file and then removed some of the contents of both.  They both decrease in size when this is done.

Not real sure what you mean.

I like the windoz comment though.
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Drew LakeAuthor Commented:
How about a personal folder, in Outlook 2000, for example?  If you were to add large emails that made the personal folder grow to 1Gig in size and then remove a majority of the information/emails the personal folder would remain 1Gig.  It is true that you could then compress the information, but needless to say the file would remain 1Gig no matter what unless compressed.  I also believe this is the same procedure for a Mail Store in Exchange, even an Access Data Base, or a virtual machine in Microsoft Virtual PC.  I hope this helps in the quest.

-RIHD
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JAMEZCommented:
Hey RIHD- I know exactly what you mean- I have seen these with my own eyes as I used to work for an audio hard drive company. They are files that are laced with corrupt data, known as a bloated file sometimes, expanding is also an appropriate name, but basically we know exactly these files and saw them when the data would be sometimes growing larger than the partition size or even the size of the hard drive!! I would name them f***ed or corrupt,/your choice.
JAMEZ
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ngravattCommented:
personal files in outlook are reduced in size all the time.  if you delte the files out of your inbox, they go to the deleted items folder.  But then all you have to do is remove them from your deleted items folder.
I have to do this about once a month.  In outlook 2002, a pst file could not be larger than 2 gigs, so i had to make users delete mail all the time.

Like tmireles said, it could be some secure file, where each time you make a change or delete something, it saves the previous setting or change so that you can undo the change in the future if you want.  Now that would makes sense.
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Drew LakeAuthor Commented:
Netman66,

Thanks for the information.

-RIHD
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