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Help with piggy backing a switch to a router

Posted on 2004-08-11
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The office where I work is currently using a small 8-port router to connect our small internal network together.  The router is hooked up to a comcast cable modem for outside internet access.  I have a 16-port switch that I would like to add.  The problem is that I do not know how to add it so that I still have one contiguous network.  We are running Windows 2003 SBS.  DHCP is currently runnning.  Any ideas on how to get this to work?
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Question by:Mach70803
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by:distribuidoracopydata
distribuidoracopydata earned 400 total points
ID: 11778740
First of all, check on the switch to see if it has an "uplink" port. if it does connect that port to any port on the routerwith an ethernet RJ45 cable, if it doesn't, get a "crossover cable" and connect that cable to any port on the router from any port on the switch, I prefer to put it on port one, but it'll work on any of them. and that's it...  if you have problems post and we'll work from there..
Paco
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gravityfan earned 600 total points
ID: 11779027
As far as having a single contiguous network, you will have. The DHCP scope will work for all stations connected to either switch. In other words, you will still have a single broadcast domain, and you could connect multiple switches in various combinations and still retain a single broadcast domain. You would have to introduce some form of routing into the topology to provide disparate broadcast domains.

One thing to look out for. If you connect the 16-port switch into a port on the 8-port switch, then the stations connected to the 16-port will have to share the bandwidth of the port on the 8-port between them (for traffic not staying on the 16-port switch, that is). You may want to think about connecting servers or high-traffic stations into the remaining 7 ports on the 8-porter, and lower-traffic stations onto the 16-porter, for this reason.

Check if your devices are Auto-MDIX. If so, then you can connect any port on the 16-porter to any port on the 8-porter, and you don't even need a cross-over cable. If they are older devices, look out for the port that is either duplicated both ways, or switchable between the two. Then you will have to use the correct type of cable: crossover or straight. Older devices also sometimes insist that any uplinking is done through either the first or last port.

Other than any parculiarities of the switches, it should be a "lego" job - no worries. Like Nike say - "Just Do It".

Have fun, hope this was of some help.
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by:fixnix
ID: 11779082
Exactly right.  I've done the same with a 10/100 switch in between a 10base-T only hub and a 100base-T only hub just to make use of old hardware (the 10base-t end was connected to a 1.1mbit SDSL router so I wasn't really losing anything with the slow ethernet, it fed the external servers).  Currently at the home test lab I have 25 (mostly old free junk) computers spread over 3 switches and hubs plugged in to a meager 4 port SDSL router.  According to the SDSL router manual it can only address 8 mac addresses but I've had no connectivity problems with any of the machines here.  A similar router at work is splitting off 4 subnets (4 more routers), one with 3 additional hubs and one with one additional.  Cheap linksys routers seem to need to be reset periodically and I would suspect it's some kind of arp cache issue, but once a week I power cycle the linksys's (that the tenants bought) and they never call me anymore saying their internet is down.  $5 2-port Siemens 2102 routers from eBay actually do better haha. Never had to reset one of those yet.
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by:Mach70803
ID: 11780389
Good advice.  I had tried it once before, but I didn't think to check for an uplink port or use a crossover cable.  I will give it a whirl tomorrow and get back to you all.
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