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GRUB and no boot

Posted on 2004-08-12
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I just took off Linux Suse 9.0 from a dual boot desktop I had. I used partition Magic and wipe the Lunix and added it back to my original C:\ which had windows XP home on it first. Now when I start all I get is the word GRUB and thats it no boot.
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Question by:rickrack17
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Karl Heinz Kremer earned 500 total points
ID: 11789030
You need to recreate your master boot record. Take a look at this previously answered question in the EE system: http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/WinXP/Q_20897186.html
Don't use the accepted answer! Scroll further down and read the whole discussion. You want to use dj_ludachris's suggestion.
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by:Karl Heinz Kremer
ID: 11789038
And here is SuSE's take on this: Scroll down to the Windows XP section: http://portal.suse.com/sdb/en/2002/08/fhassel_deinstall_lilo.html
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by:rickrack17
ID: 11789392
thanks
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