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Respawning too fast, disabled for 5 minutes????

Posted on 2004-08-12
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Iam working in an institution, and in some of my machines iam getting this error and iam not able to work.

"Init: Id "4"  respawning too fast : disabled for 5 minutes"
"Init: Id "5"  respawning too fast : disabled for 5 minutes"
"Init: Id "6"  respawning too fast : disabled for 5 minutes"

help me
 
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Question by:udaikumar
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by:gheist
ID: 11790921
What is your system (uname -a)
What do you run on virtual consoles 4 5 and 6 ???
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Gns earned 250 total points
ID: 11791228
Here we go again... Please talk to us this time udaikumar...;-)

This "Respawning too fast" problem indicate that whatever the init process is supposed to run at virtual console 4, 5 and 6 simply fail. This could of course be due to any number of reasons, and depend on what you are supposed to run there.
On a typical redhat system you'd be spawning some form of getty on those, on other distros it might actually be the X server and/or displaymanager having problems starting.

So for the affected systems you need start by looking at the /etc/inittab file and look for the specific line for the "terminal line" in question, the initdefault and anything started at that runlevel... A relevant excerpt from a redhatish system might look like:
# Run gettys in standard runlevels
1:2345:respawn:/sbin/mingetty tty1
2:2345:respawn:/sbin/mingetty tty2
3:2345:respawn:/sbin/mingetty tty3
4:2345:respawn:/sbin/mingetty tty4
5:2345:respawn:/sbin/mingetty tty5
6:2345:respawn:/sbin/mingetty tty6

# Run xdm in runlevel 5
# xdm is now a separate service
x:5:respawn:/etc/X11/prefdm -nodaemon
---------------------------------
... where (in this case) console 4-6 is running mingetty (terminal login more or less:-), and console 7 is running a display manager...

If you can see that most of these machines are trying to run X in a similar fashion, then it is very likely that they're unable to start the X server due to faulty configuration... And you need look at/solve these each, since they're not likely to be missconfigured the exact same way;-). (But it might be something else too...:-)

So looking at the X server logs would then be the logical next step. For XFree86 that'd likely be the /var/log/XFree86.0.log file... Which is very voluminous, and likely have "the good stuff" at the end...

We'll be happy to help you deduce exactly what is the matter with each system. A big help in doing so would be relevant excerpts from the files mentioned, in conjuntion with information about hardware involved and distribution (and version!) of linux (and perhaps version/implementation of X, if not obvious from the excerpts&other info:-).

-- Glenn
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by:gheist
ID: 12545216
gns answer is more complete, asker is not interested for sure..
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by:Gns
ID: 12548410
Seems so, yes... I always wonder with these.... Why do they even bother to pose the question? Sigh...

-- Glenn
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