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Where does Win2K store SSL certificates?

Posted on 2004-08-13
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Last Modified: 2010-04-14
I need to know exactly where Win2K stores SSL certificate contents.  I am writing my own SSL software, and I need to examine and experiment with the certificates on my machine.
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Question by:RHenningsgard
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11 Comments
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:magus123
ID: 11795607

it all depends on what ssl your going to use if its for  things like people to go to your commercial website
and buy stuff then some people buy theirs , so they can be trusted . also the level of ssl



http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/SSL-Certificates-HOWTO/x64.html
http://www.geotrust.com/
http://www.whichssl.com/
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LVL 2

Author Comment

by:RHenningsgard
ID: 11795638
Uh...OK, but that has absolutely nothing to do with my question.

I need to know the path to the files containing the certificates already on my Win2K machine, not get a tutorial on what SSL is, how it works, or how it is used.

Rob---
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LVL 9

Accepted Solution

by:
jdeclue earned 250 total points
ID: 11795688
Here is the SDK information on using the Certificate provider. I would not suggest trying to go around this, as Microsoft does not store the certificates as files, like OpenSSL etc. Micrsoft handle SSL like a cryptograhic sessions.


http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/seccrypto/security/certificate.asp
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LVL 86

Assisted Solution

by:jkr
jkr earned 250 total points
ID: 11795695
The so called "Protected Storage" service stores them. See http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/reskit/en-us/distrib/dscj_mcs_ssft.asp ("Windows 2000 Certificate Services and Public Key Infrastructure") and http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/reskit/en-us/distrib/dsck_efs_ifzc.asp ("How Certificates are stored")
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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:jdeclue
ID: 11795720
Here is a much better article on using the certificate provider, posted above...

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/seccrypto/security/certificate.asp

J
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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:jdeclue
ID: 11795748
OK I wasnt able to get the link... When you follow the link expand the selections on the left and look at the technical articles as well, they should explain all. P.S. This is Windows 2000 forum, not development, so you will mostly get the Tech answers here. ;)


J
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LVL 2

Author Comment

by:RHenningsgard
ID: 11795991
OK, you guys got me on track so I'm going to split up the points.  I am also going to volunteer this discovery, which would have solved the exact problem I was trying to solve.

If you go to Users and Passwords | Advanced | Certificates, you can get Windows to spit out any of its certificates into plain files, either binary or base-64.  (Then you can copy them wherever you want them!)

Thanks all,

Rob---
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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:jdeclue
ID: 11796015
Sorry, I misread your question and thought you needed to create certifates etc.

J
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LVL 86

Expert Comment

by:jkr
ID: 11796040
>> OK, you guys got me on track so I'm going to split up the points

Hm, seems that did not work...
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LVL 2

Author Comment

by:RHenningsgard
ID: 11796082
I fouled up.  Will correct it with support.
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