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filename* appears while doing ls in solaris

Posted on 2004-08-16
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
On Solaris 9.0,
when I do ls -l some filenames have * after them.
For e.g if filename is xyz.cpp, it appears like xyz.cpp*
Can someone please explain what does it mean/indicate?
Is it got to do with the versioning system we are using? SCCS?
Thanks
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Question by:dkamdar
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4 Comments
 
LVL 18

Accepted Solution

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liddler earned 375 total points
ID: 11811064
Not sure about Solaris 9 but in earliler doing ls -F puts an asterix after executeables.

Do you have ls aliased to ls -F ?

type:
alias
to find your list of aliases
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Expert Comment

by:Tintin
ID: 11815308
Either your profile or the system wide profile will have aliased ls.

If you don't like that behaviour, you can turn it off with

unalias ls
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Expert Comment

by:anon1m0us
ID: 11816447
I have to agree with Tintin & Lidder. All the Asterik means is  the files with a trailing asterisk is an executable.

If you do an ls -l and it appears, it might be defined as an alias. You should follow the two above suggestions to remove the alias. However, it is a no biggie.

Here are some other signs you might see.

Directories are marked with a trailing slash (`/'), and symbolic links with  a  trailing  at-sign  (`@').

All this is occurs if you do ls -F
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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:Otetelisanu
ID: 11817677
You can make

\ls -l
and is only ls not alias.

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