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DNS setup scenarios

Posted on 2004-08-16
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Last Modified: 2010-04-19
I've read of 2 ways to setup DNS for Active Directory.  1 On the fly - when prompted during DCpromo. 2. Setting up DNS on a 'stand-alone' server- (I assume that's a serverwhich is not a domain member) and then running DC promo.  What's the preferred method of DNS setup if the PDC upgrade is just going to be temporary and we will eventually have 2 DCs which are clean installs? Are there any reasons why you would do it one way or the other way?
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Question by:imherson
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by:shard26
shard26 earned 50 total points
ID: 11812955
Either way is fine. # 1 is probably easier.

You eventually want to have the DNS service running on all your DC's

Do you have a DNS server on your LAN already?
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by:imherson
ID: 11812990
We have but they are static and will have to forward to them for access to resources outside our domain.  I'm wondering if there is a situation why
you would want the DNS server on the DC?  Or why you would want the DNS server not to be a domain member?
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ckratsch earned 450 total points
ID: 11813171
Microsoft requires that a DC have access to a DNS server.  Usually, this means DNS will be installed on a DC, and then usually on *all* DCs.  Since AD is tied so closely with DNS, having DNS installed and running on every DC helps to prevent lookup failures in the case of non-AD related problems, like network outages.

I would agree that your option 1 is preferable.

Option 2 can be used, however, with a non-DC Windows DNS server, or a non-Windows BIND DNS server (I forget now exactly which version of BIND is required .. 8.6 or newer?).  In this configuration, with a stand-alone server (that meaning a member server, not necessarily a non-domain member), no DCs are *required* to be DNS servers.

But, as above, being that AD and DNS are so closely linked, I prefer to have all DCs also be DNS servers.

Option 3, which they made us do in class, is to install DNS on a member server first, get it fully functional, *then* run dcpromo.  The benefit of this is that you learn to get all the ducks in a row, so far as reverse lookup zones and PTR records are concerned.  Or, the wizard will do it for you just as well.  While this is another way to do it, I don't see any benefit for it outside of a classroom environment.

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