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I NEED TO INSTALL SCO UNIX 5.05 ON MY NEW P4 BOX SATA HARD DRIVE

Posted on 2004-08-17
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Last Modified: 2013-12-05
HI,

I HAVE NEW PENTIUM 4 BOX AND CONFIGURATION IS 2.8 GHZ AND 80 GB SATA DRIVE. INTEL GBF 865
AFTER BOOTING FROM CD THE INITIALL RESPONSE IS NO HARD DRIVE CONTROLLER FOUND AND  0 HARD DISK FOUND.

NOW THE PROBLEM IS, IF I.D HARD DRIVE IS ATTACHED THEN IT WORKS BUT SATA HARD DRIVE IN THE SAME BOX DOESN'T. KINDLY ADVICE ME HOW CAN BE CONFIGURED AND ISTALLED SCO UNIX 5.05.

FURTHERMORE FULL HARD DISK CAPACITY SHOULD BE UTALIZED, WHEN EVER I TRIED TO USE MORE THAN 10 GB, UNIX DOESN'T ACCEPT / SUPPORT AND ONLY COUNT 8 GB.

THANKS AND REGARDS.
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Question by:intelent
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by:gheist
ID: 11822304
You can use BIOS to make sure that SATA controller emulates Legacy controller.
Formally it is not supported, and Intel provides no drivers.

Other way is to install WindowsXP or RedHat or SuSE Linux and VmWare workstation on them and run SCO UNIX inside virtual machine.
(no one here forced you to buy incompatible hardware btw)
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kmckinstry earned 125 total points
ID: 11825960
Right now SCO does not support SATA drives.  If you know about creating drivers, you could write your own.  You may be able to manipulate SCO into using the driver through the SCOAdmin Serial Manager.

As far as utilizing the entire hard drive, Unix tends to except the information from the BIOS.  If the BIOS doesn't recognize the entire drive, then Unix won't.  You may want to check the BIOS settings and try some options there, or if you can turn off the BIOS hard drive function, you might be able to get Unix to see the entire drive (minus the normal overhead that Unix requires.)

You could contact the Company that supports/creates the drive and see if they have a driver, and you might want to get in touch with the BIOS manufacturer to see if they have an update for the BIOS.

One final approach to circumventing the BIOS limitation is to create your own SCO filesystems so that the root filesystem lies below the BIOS drive information. If you cannot do this, then no matter how many times the kernel is relinked, there is no way for /unix to cross the BIOS boundary. So, what to do with the remainder of the hard drive? The answer to this is that this space can be allocated to secondary filesystems, such as a /u filesystem.
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by:yuzh
ID: 11827391
Why do you want to use SCO 5.0.5, it is old, and the kernel doesn't support
P4 CPU + SATA DRIVE.

To modify the kernel to run on the new HW is not an easy task. I remember
back to long time ago, when the first IDE tape driver was release (about 1996?),
there was no driver for SCO, and I have to make it to work on SCO 5.0.2, it took
me about 2 weeks to get it to work, not bad still 2 years before SCO release HW
support for IDE tape.

SCO is getting out of the market, consider use Linux or Solaris x86 instead, have
a look at the following site:

Get a copy of Linux (Free) and install it to your PC:
       http://www.tldp.org/

Or
Get Solsris X 86 (free) from:
       http://wwws.sun.com/software/solaris/binaries/get.html


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