?
Solved

How to connect from one linux M/C to another linux M/C useing /net command

Posted on 2004-08-20
7
Medium Priority
?
259 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-20
Hi All,

I wanted to connect to linux server in my office from my linux machine.
ftp and telnet is not allow to user, they r given me the command

/net/servername/foldername

to connect to that server. But when I execute, it gives an error

" bash: /net/servername/foldername : no such file or directory."

what could be the problem and how to solve it.

Thanks in advance
Regards
Sudheer
0
Comment
Question by:sudheer_tp
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
7 Comments
 
LVL 36

Expert Comment

by:grblades
ID: 11853379
Hi sudheer_tp,
> /net/servername/foldername
This is meaningless.

So ftp and telnet are not permitted?
What about ssh?
ssh is very secure and you can transfer files across it using the scp command.
0
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:pjedmond
ID: 11855972
Hmm - do they imply a shared samba folder?

Try:

smbclient -L servername

servername can be an ip address. This will give you a list of shares available that you can connect to and share. You will then need to connect to it, but this is usually not available to anyone other than root.

Try:

ssh servername and see if you get a login prompt. If you do, then you can use the command scp in order to transfer data between the systems.

Use:

man ssh
man scp
man smbclient

to find out more.

HTH:)

0
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 500 total points
ID: 11856787
Usage of /net/servername/folder presumes that the local machine has the am-utils package installed and that the amd service is enabled and running. That mechanism is an automount (via the /net amd map) of an NFS resource. Neat stuff really...
0
 
LVL 1

Assisted Solution

by:ramez_hanna
ramez_hanna earned 500 total points
ID: 11879740
the path given is probably a network share that will be mounted upon your login so just do a #cd /net/servername/folder that is if you are logging to the linux server
what is the login authority? samba? NIS? or just local

if you login locally then this could be a samba share or a NFS you will have to mount the share
if you are using fedora or redhat you can just do in nautilus smb://servername/folder/ and you'll be able to browse the samba share
or simply use the mount command for both NFS or samba shares
"#man mount" and you'll find what you need to do it it's easy
0
 

Author Comment

by:sudheer_tp
ID: 12079131
thanks a lot for all who responded.

Problem is solved
0

Featured Post

NFR key for Veeam Agent for Linux

Veeam is happy to provide a free NFR license for one year.  It allows for the non‑production use and valid for five workstations and two servers. Veeam Agent for Linux is a simple backup tool for your Linux installations, both on‑premises and in the public cloud.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

You ever wonder how to backup Linux system files just like Windows System Restore?  Well you can use Timeshift in Linux to perform those similar action.  This tutorial will show you how to backup your system files and keep regular intervals. Note…
Fine Tune your automatic Updates for Ubuntu / Debian
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.
This demo shows you how to set up the containerized NetScaler CPX with NetScaler Management and Analytics System in a non-routable Mesos/Marathon environment for use with Micro-Services applications.
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month13 days, 10 hours left to enroll

800 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question