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Google Words

Posted on 2004-08-21
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Last Modified: 2011-08-18
OK - what are some of those little extra google works I can use?  Like site: www.domain.com testing, or links: www.domain.com, or allinanchor: www.domain.com

I know they might be a in a book - but I have to go to the bookstore or I have to order the book & wait til Monday.  This is a lot easier :)

Thanks!

-Corey
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Question by:coreybryant
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by:e-strategyst
e-strategyst earned 100 total points
ID: 11858842
coreybryant -

When using these operators, keep in mind that the syntax, or form,
is xxx:URL, where xxx is the operator and URL is the domain
name, also known as the web page’s URL. For example, a search
for links to one of my favorite web pages is link:www.familysearch.
org/Eng/Search/frameset_search.asp. Note that you do not
need and should not include the “http://” portion of a web address.
cache:
A search result using the cache: operator will show the web page
version in the Google cache. But what is a cache? Originally, cache
was a French word meaning “to hide.” Canadian and western frontier
explorers and fur trappers adopted the word to mean “a hiding
place,” especially “for concealing and preserving provisions or
implements.” Today, cache, in the computer industry, refers to “a
secure, temporary storage place.” So, Google’s cache is the
temporary storage of web pages on secure Google computers.
Storing web pages on Google’s computers has several major advantages
from our perspective (not Google’s) and one great
disadvantage. The advantages are:
 Faster access time to web pages. Since you are accessing a
web page stored on a Google computer, you do not need to
bounce around the Internet in multiple hops and electronic
switches, gateways, and routers to get to the web page source
that might be an overworked, slow computer or server.
 Availability of web pages. Google has a 99.9 percent uptime.
Most web servers are single-machine enterprises that must go
down occasionally for maintenance, either on schedule or as the
result of an unplanned event (like a lightning strike). When a
server is offline and unavailable, you can still see the last version
of any of the server’s web pages by viewing Google’s
cached version.
 Longevity of web page. When a web site is removed from the
host server, Google’s cached version remains available for
about another four to six weeks.
 Security. Web pages can be infected with Internet flotsam and
jetsam (i.e., viruses, trojan horses, worms, and other malicious
program code). Google does provide a code-checking function
on web pages before they are cached, so you are reasonably
assured that the cached web page is free of malicious code.

link:
to find web pages that link to the web page you specify in the query box. The format
for a link: query is just like that for cache:, [link:www.loan-mortgage-calculator.net].

Things to remember about a link: query:
 A link: query works in any Google query/search box.
 You can use search words in a link: query if you place them
after the domain name, separated by spaces.
 A link: query tells you how many web pages (not necessarily
web sites) are linked to the domain name used in the query.
The number of “hits,” or search results, provides this
information.
 If you have a business arrangement with web sites to link to
your site, you can easily verify those links.

related:
related: is similar to the Similar feature. It returns links to web
pages similar to the domain name of the domain in the related:
query. related:www.experts-exchange.com

info:
An info: query returns links to the domain name included in the
query along with the first 24 or so words in the web page’s title or
upper page information.
Things to remember about an info: query:
 An info: query works in any Google query/search box.
 You can use up to ten keywords in an info: query if you place
them after the domain name, separated by spaces.

stock:
stock: treats all text after [stock:] as stock ticker symbols. The
format for a stock: query is the same as a related: query,
[info:www.yahoo.com]. For example, [stock:yhoo] will return a link
where you can retrieve Yahoo’s stock price.

site:
The site: query will restrict search results to the specified web
pages in the domain specified. The form of the site: query is [xxx
site:TLD/domain name] or [site:TLD/domain name xxx], where xxx
is one or more keywords. You can search up to ten keywords.
Things to remember about a site: query:
 A site: query works in any Google query/search box.
 You can use up to ten keywords in a site: query if you place
them after the domain name, separated by spaces.
Note that you can use site: to search any TLD. TLDs are .edu,
.com, .gov, .org, etc., or any web site.

allintitle:
The allintitle: query will restrict search results to links to those
web pages containing all of the keywords in the title of the page.
The form of the allintitle: query is [allintitle:keyword xxx], where
xxx is one or more keywords, up to a maximum of ten.
Things to remember about an allintitle: query:
 An allintitle: query works in any Google query/search box.
 You can include up to ten keywords in an allintitle: query.

intitle:
The intitle: query restricts search results to links of those web
pages containing the first word after the intitle: query in the title of
the page. The form of the intitle: query is [intitle:keyword xxx],
where xxx is one or more keywords. You can search up to nine
additional keywords for a maximum of ten.

allinurl:
The allinurl: query will restrict search results to links of those web
pages containing all of the keywords in the URL of the page. The
form of the allinurl: query is [allinurl:keyword].

inurl:
The inurl: query will restrict search results to links to those web
pages containing the first word after the inurl: query in the URL of
the page. The form of the inurl: query is [inurl:keyword]. You can
search up to nine additional keywords in the inurl: query.


I hope that has helped a little bit.

Drop me a line if you need additional info.

E-Strategyst
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Assisted Solution

by:Delacourt
Delacourt earned 100 total points
ID: 11858971
I think e-strategyst has a lot more info up there:

but:

http://www.google.com/help/features.html

and try their web apis, spell checking etc

see www.tucj.com for a guide on using googlewebapi for spellcheck (see bottom right link on page)

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by:LRI41
LRI41 earned 100 total points
ID: 11859264
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Threat Intelligence Starter Resources

Integrating threat intelligence can be challenging, and not all companies are ready. These resources can help you build awareness and prepare for defense.

 
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Assisted Solution

by:humeniuk
humeniuk earned 100 total points
ID: 11859268
Great tips from E-Strategyst.  He listed the most useful ones, but for the heck of it, here are a couple more:

> A small thing - remember that word order matters with the earlier words searched getting more emphasis than the later words.

> Search by date range - 'daterange:startdate-enddate'.   The pain in the butt part of this is you have to express the date in the Julian format (ie. a count of days since January 1, 4713 BC, so July 8, 2002 is 2452463.5 - but drop the decimal for Google).  You can find a date converter to convert dates to Julian dates at http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/JulianDate.html.  Remember that the effective 'date' of any website is when it was indexed by Google, not when it was created.

> Google Wildcards - some search engines allow you to * as a wildcard character in your search , ie. search moon* and get responses for moons, moonlight, moonshot, etc.  In Google, you can only use wildcarding to stand in for a full word, such as "three * mice" which will return references to three blind mice, three blue mice, three angry mice, three dead mice . . . you get the idea.  This is handy if you remember most, but not all of something you're searching for, like a speech by Churchill "this was their * hour".  This is also handy in getting around the ten word search limit, ie. if you substitute * for some of the obvious words in your search (again, if you're searching a phrase or quotation or something), they don't count towards the 10 word limit.

> Phone numbers -  if you search 'phonebook:c bryant ca' you'll get all the phonebook listings for C Bryant in California (up to a maximum of 600).  If you search rphonebook: you get residential listings only, if you search bphonebook: you get business listings only.  The more specific you get, the better, ie. 'rphonebook:corey bryant berkeley ca' gets you all the Corey Bryants listed in the Berkeley California phone book . . . turns out there aren't any.

> Off topic - if you use Mozilla (like me), but like to use the Google toolbar, too, you can get a Mozilla version at http://googlebar.mozdev.org.


Those are just a few more.  However, if you end up at the bookstore anyway, check out 'Google Hacks: 100 Industrial-Strength Tips & Tools' published by O'Reilly & Associates (www.oreilly.com) for many more tips.
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Accepted Solution

by:
duz earned 100 total points
ID: 11859324
Corey -

>what are some of those little extra google works I can use?

Google advanced operators here http://www.google.com/help/operators.html

And here you will find an explanation on what you can and can't do in combining them and a couple of undocumented features not in Google's guide above http://www.googleguide.com/advanced_operators.html

There are a couple more undocumented searches but if I told you then I would have to kill you :)

- duz
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Author Comment

by:coreybryant
ID: 11859354
Well coming here was quicker & a lot easier than going to get that book though :)

Duz - I'll take my chances.  LOL

Now I have an easy way to come back & reference all of this.

Thanks!

-Corey
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