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Winsock select

I have a fairly simple Windows TCP/IP client that I am creating.  Everything seems to work except trying to call select() to check and see if data is ready for reading on my socket.  I'm just using a standard socket with the non-blocking flag set set and the following code:

       fd_set set;

      FD_ZERO(&set);

      FD_SET(connection, &set);

      TIMEVAL tv;

      tv.tv_sec = timeout;

      int err = 0;
      
      switch(opt)
      {
            case 0:
                  err = select(0, &set, (fd_set*)NULL, (fd_set*)NULL, &tv);
                  break;
            case 1:
                  err = select(0, (fd_set*)NULL, &set, (fd_set*)NULL, &tv);
                  break;
            case 2:
                  err = select(0, (fd_set*)NULL, (fd_set*)NULL, &set, &tv);
                  break;
      }

      if((err == 0) || (err == SOCKET_ERROR))
            return false;

      return FD_ISSET(connection, &set);

When I call the above function, it ALWAYS returns true.  When I step through the code, err is set to ERROR_SUCCCESS and FD_ISSSET returns nonzero, even if there is no data on the socket to be read.

I am not stuck using the above solution.  Any way that you can suggest to find out if the socket is ready for reading would be fine as long as it doesn not use asynchronous sockets.
0
dirtdart
Asked:
dirtdart
4 Solutions
 
kevinnguyenCommented:
I think you should check on (connection + 1) rather than 0 in select() function:

err = select(connection + 1, &set, (fd_set*)NULL, (fd_set*)NULL, &tv);

instead

err = select(0, &set, (fd_set*)NULL, (fd_set*)NULL, &tv);

Besides, opt can be one of three values 0, 1, and 2. select() is called when there is data to read, to write and there is exception in file descriptor (connection)

opt = 0. When there is data to read
opt = 1. When there is data to write
opt = 2. When there is exception on file descriptor.

select() can return TRUE because FD_ISSET() returns nonzero when there is data to write even there is no data to read from file descriptor (connection)
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dirtdartAuthor Commented:
Thank you for your comment.  Let me clarify a bit, though.  I am writing this exclusively for Windows sockets.  According to the documentation, the nfds (first parameter of select) is ignored and only included for compaitiblity with Berkley sockets.  So I don't think that is the problem.
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drichardsCommented:
>> I'm just using a standard socket with the non-blocking flag

Do these functions work with non-blocking sockets?  Docs are not clear on that.  With non-blocking sockets you are notified when events occur and there is not a need to poll using select.
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dirtdartAuthor Commented:
Honestly, I don't really know.  I'm using select to poll the socket, because if I use recv on a socket that contains no data, it will stall the entire program until data comes in.  If data never comes in, then the call to recv will never return.  If there's a better way to do it, then I'll be glad to hear it.
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daver1000Commented:
How about setting a  small time out for the recv.
e.g
setsockopt(ConnectSocket, SOL_SOCKET, SO_RCVTIMEO, (char *)&chtimeout, izeof(chtimeout));


Then the recv will wait for small amount of time (not blocking).
bytesRecv = recv( ConnectSocket, recvbuf, 32, 0 );
    if ( bytesRecv==0 || bytesRecv ==WSAETIMEDOUT )
   {
     //Nothing to read
    }
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rhodgsonCommented:
>>When I call the above function, it ALWAYS returns true.  When I step through the code, err is set to ERROR_SUCCCESS and FD_ISSSET returns nonzero, even if there is no data on the socket to be read.
>>if((err == 0) || (err == SOCKET_ERROR))  return false;

I am a little confused, ERROR_SUCCESS is a constant defined as 0, therefore if err is always set to ERROR_SUCCESS then the function should always return false.

Apart from that opt=0 should be waiting for data to be available for read, and it doesn't make any difference to select if you are using blocking or non-blocking sockets.
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