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Hard drive visible in win 98 but not NT4.0

I have a dual boot pentium II 400 mhz system with win98 and NT4.0. After I installed a network card for DSL everything worked fine but when I boot NT4.0 I can see only one of my two hard drives. All of the hard drives and partitions appear correctly in win98. If I run Belarc advisor it sees the 2nd hard drive when I am in NT.

  Thanks in advance for comments and help

Bill
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2 Solutions
 
wparrottCommented:
If you remove the network card and boot back to NT4.0, does the drive show back up?
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
I am a little reluctant  to do this but maybe I should try. The network card works fine in win 98

Bill
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
Removing the network card did not fix the problem. Good idea to try but not the solution.

Bill
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wparrottCommented:
What about removing the network driver from NT? Since the card works and you can see the drives fine in 98 I doubt that you have a hardware issue. Removing the card and booting to NT proves that. I'd remove the driver from NT (leave the card in the computer), reboot and see what happens.
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Cyber-DudeCommented:
Is the second drive partitioned?

Cyber
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
The second drive is partioned, I can see everything on in win 98 and with partition magic.

Bill
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Cyber-DudeCommented:
Try to deignate a drive letter via disk manager. This will solve your problems...

If you wish to fix this via registry; just tell me and I'll locate you through the steps on how to do it...

Cyber
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gainesvillegymCommented:
is the 2nd drive partitioned & formated with fat 32?  NT 4 does not reconize fat 32 drives
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
  I think I need to clarify to the various experts that the second drive was previously partioned into sections of NTFS, fat16, and fat32 blocks. This scheme was working fine in both NT4.0 and win 98(over 1.5 years) before I installed a number of microsoft security updates to NT4.0 and a network driver card and associated software simultaneously.

   I think the problem is more related to downloading and installing the micrososft updates than either the network card and its software. I have tried using disk administrator in nt4.0 to see the disk but with no success. I still find it significant that Belarc advisor can see the disk (when I am running NT4.0) but the operating system says it is not there.
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wparrottCommented:
Have you installed sp6 yet? If not, try downloading and installing it. If you have and have applied service patches since then, re-run sp6 install. As a last resort, try removing the patches that you installed prior to it working. It would appear that the network card isn't the issue.
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
I reinstalled SP6 but this did not fix the problem. I tried some software on the western digital sites which indicates that the drive is there in NT but the WD software could not access the drive.

   It seems like a piece of software that is supposed to detect the secondary 40 gb drive during win NT startup is not running correctly. I cannot find this piece of software within the control panel settings.

Thanks

Bill
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wparrottCommented:
Open Regedit and find this line:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer

look for this value:
NoDrives
Data Type: REG_DWORD
Data: x   <---X will be some value

If any values for NoDrives is set, it could be hiding your drives from you. Here's the possible values and the drive letter it will hide:

x is for: A: 1, B: 2, C: 4, D: 8, E: 16, F: 32, G: 64, H: 128, I: 256, J: 512, K: 1024, L: 2048, M: 4096, N: 8192, O: 16384, P: 32768, Q: 65536, R: 131072, S: 262144, T: 524288, U: 1048576, V: 2097152, W: 4194304, X: 8388608, Y: 16777216, Z: 33554432, ALL: 67108863

Just grasping at straws here...
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wparrottCommented:
Another suggestion:

If you go to Start > Programs > Administrative Tools > Disk Administrator

Do you see the 2nd drive listed at all? If so, what does it show (please describe). There is an option there to assign drive letters to partitions, but not sure exactly what the procedure is (I'm not running NT here anymore).

Just another straw to grasp here...
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sriwiCommented:
WIn 98 could not see NTFS partition, is that the problem that you having ?

by default win 98 could detect ntfs you have to download/run a special software to make it detect.

if i am not wrong it is ntfsfordos, can be downloaded from google.

and this got to do nothing with Network card at all.

Hope that helps
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mirage084Commented:
As mentioned above NT only can read FAT16 and NTFS but not fat32 maybe that's the case as from your talk I understand you use partition magic ...maybe out of the blue you converted the partition or so. That's the only possibility or perhaps you could check for any conflicts............
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
I am considering windows XP home on this system, would that solve all of these problems (probably?)

Bill
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prav007Commented:
Dear Bill,

Using Windows XP should solve all of your problems .But then again using Partition Magic is also a great solution since I have solved many such issues using Partition magic .What I believe is that might be some of the disk controller drivers have been replaced or something like that.

Best Regards,
Praveen
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
  I installed WIN XP and the problem was resolved. 400 points to wparrot for many good trouble-shooting ideas and 100 points to prav007 because he was correct about XP solving the problem.

Thanks

Bill
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