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Is piping the answer

Posted on 2004-08-23
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I am trying to create a directory within a folder that is retrieved by a find command.  I came up with something like this:

find . -regex '.*\/foo' | mkdir -v foo2

But it doesn't work.

Help please.
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Question by:oracleapprentice
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8 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:griessh
ID: 11875427
Hi oracleapprentice,

find . -type d -name '*foo' | read; cd $REPLY; mkdir foo2;  cd -

This won't work if you are expecting more than one '*foo' dirs

======
Werner
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by:Gns
ID: 11880311
.... In which case you'd need do it like a for loop, and create the subdir in every found result...
(also a slight amendment Werner, I think s/he's looking for the fixed name "foo", not any dir ending in foo)
for dir in `find . -type d -name "foo"`; do cd $dir; mkdir foo2; cd $OLDPWD; done

(Also take care with regexs' and globs including ".*"... At least when recursing ... not so bad here though:-)

-- Glenn
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Author Comment

by:oracleapprentice
ID: 11882344
I found this to work for me.

find . -regex '.*\/foo' -exec mkdir -v '{}/foo2' \;
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Expert Comment

by:Gns
ID: 11889957
Hm, ok. Just another little warning, that solution relies on GNU find (which is not generally available on Unix systems) while the (slightly simplified) for loop solution works on most any unix/linux (note also that most mkdir versions don't have the -v flag either):
for dir in `find . -type d -name "foo"`; do  mkdir $dir/foo2; done

-- Glenn
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LVL 48

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by:Tintin
ID: 11899014
Easy enough for a portable find solution (maybe a few rare exceptions)

find . -type d -name "*foo" -exec mkdir '{}/foo2' \;
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by:Gns
ID: 11900644
The glob is still wrong Tintin, but otherwise true:-)

-- Glenn
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