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Motherboard Temperature Question

Posted on 2004-08-26
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Last Modified: 2013-12-09
I have an Asus A7N8X-E Deluxe with a Athlon XP 2600+ chip.  I've read most people saying that the chip should run between 40-50C, but there are 3 temp sensors displayed in the BIOS (System, CPU Core, CPU Surface).  They generally run 64C, 72C, 53C respectively.  Are these ok temps and according to other posts here that 70C is the critical temp, so is that dealing with the CPU Surface temp?

Thanks!
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Question by:durrence71
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5 Comments
 
LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:AlbertaBeef
ID: 11906753
I doubt very much those are the temps of your CPU.  Asus A7N8X series is notoriously bad with it's temperature probes' accuracy.  

You can often obtain vastly different temperature readings simply by flashing your bios...  

But if your system is running fine, I wouldn't worry tremendously.  If it's crashing, shutting down, etc., then you have problems.
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Expert Comment

by:Callandor
ID: 11921195
You can check it by opening your case and putting your hand on the heatsink.  70C is pretty hot, while 50C is warm.  The 2600+ has a temperature limit of 85C.
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Expert Comment

by:AlbertaBeef
ID: 11921837
of course, that 85C limit is internal die temp...  which unfortunately we have no way to measure.  
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Accepted Solution

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HippyWarlock earned 200 total points
ID: 11928104
Use the temperatures displayed to you by your mobo as relative temperature, that is, don't compare them to your friends exact same mobo, or indeed any other mobo (as Alberta says, this mobo is innacurate, in fact there is no common standard of calibration for mobo temp sensors that I am aware of). Instead compare them relative to your own mobo.

If you overclock the PC, then note how much the temp has changed. And if you feel brave - clock the PC until it freezes due to overheating and note the temp it freezes at (you gotta be quick here :-) ).

Not too sure about your CPU but Intel has an inbuilt chunk of code that monitors the die temp.

HTH - Peace
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:HippyWarlock
ID: 11936168
Thanks but to be honest I think AlbertaBeef deserved a split... then again he's got too many points - good call durrence71  

 : - )
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