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Problems unmounting NTFS Partitions in Fedora

Posted on 2004-08-26
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
I have been having problems with my Fedora Release 1 (kernel: 2.4.22-1.2115.nptlsmp). Whenever I try to access my D drive (Win 2K Pro), I am unable to unmount it after that. I keep getting a device is busy error. I have no such problems with my C Drive though both have similar entries in /etc/fstab:
/dev/hda1     /mnt/C-ntfs:     ntfs     auto,user,ro,umask=0022     0 0
/dev/hda2     /mnt/D-ntfs:     ntfs     auto,user,ro,umask=0022     0 0

Can someone help me. I am going mad as I cant safely shutdown my system. (it hangs whenever trying to unmount the drive) and everytime I have to switch off the power - here it hangs  during the boot process when I try to switch on.

Advanced thanks for any help
Rajesh
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Question by:hsejars
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8 Comments
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:bloemkool1980
ID: 11910566
device busy is not an error but an indication that something is accessing the drive.
Are you sure that you are not on the drive when you do unmount?
if you are in mnt/C on the moment you do unmount it will not work.
Are you starting a process that uses the drive ? Maybe you shared the /mnt/C in ftp or samba ?
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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:Jase-Coder
ID: 11911564
Hi this might be of some help. I read in a magazine (linux magazine) that fedora CORE 1 cannot read ntsf partitions.

This could help
http://bugzilla.redhat.com/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=109962

I think your going to have to install XFS This article might be more help
http://www.vanemery.com/Linux/ACL/linux-acl.html
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LVL 17

Assisted Solution

by:owensleftfoot
owensleftfoot earned 75 total points
ID: 11911596
You could try disabling sgi_fam. Edit /etc/xinetd.d/sgi_fam and change disable = no to disable = yes. Then run service xinetd restart.
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LVL 6

Accepted Solution

by:
de2Zotjes earned 100 total points
ID: 11914217
If you try to umount and you get a device busy, there is a process accessing the filesystem. There is a simple command to find out which processes are accessing that filesystem:

fuser -m /dev/hda2

This will give you a list of pids. You figure out what program is behind the pid using:

ps -w <pid>

Tell us what programs are accessing the filesystem.
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LVL 20

Assisted Solution

by:Gns
Gns earned 75 total points
ID: 11931081
As a far eremote possibility you could get something like this if the FS is ... bad. Try running a chkdsk (in win) on it.
But the other suggestions above (that mainly seem to boil down to the same one: something is "using" the fs, so no umount) are way more likely.

-- Glenn
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:rfennimore
ID: 11986276
Make sure you do not have Nautilus open, and nothing else is accessing those file systems.

You might also try umount with the -l switch (that is a lower case L).

If all else fails, convert your Windows drives to FAT32. Linux works better with FAT32 than with NTFS.

- Rick
0
 

Author Comment

by:hsejars
ID: 12003970
Hi Everyone

Thanks for all the help. But I really havent had time to look at this at all in depth as I have been putting 15hr days at work for the past week. I hope to look at it in detail this weekend.

I did have a similar problem with a CD I put in yesterday. I used the fuser command (as suggested by de2Zotjes) and found that fam was accessing this. I killed fam. Also, I tried usermount utility to mount my D drive (earlier i had changed the entry in fstab to noauto to avoid this problem) and found that I could unmount it after I accessed it!! So i think I need to explore more to conclude that this is THE problem.

Do i really need fam - i use my machine only as a regular home desktop. If I remove it using the method that  owensleftfoot has suggested will I have any problems later?

Gns, I did check my disk from windows and found that i dont have any problems.

Thanks to all of you once again. I will distribute the points this weekend.

Rajesh
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LVL 20

Assisted Solution

by:Gns
Gns earned 75 total points
ID: 12004201
> Do i really need fam - i use my machine only as a regular home desktop. If I remove it using the method that
> owensleftfoot has suggested will I have any problems later?
Not really. Fam is the "File Alteration Monitor", and there as a convenience for some apps that needs monitor (some) files... So having one monitor that tells interested parties (programs...) about changes is _perhaps_ a bit more efficient than having a host of prgms constantly polling the fs... That's the theory at least:-). Do read the fam manpage for more. Fam has had some ... security implications in the past, so it might even be a prudent move;)

> Gns, I did check my disk from windows and found that i dont have any problems.
Good. One less thing to worry about:-)

-- Glenn
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