engineering notation

Hello,

How do I display a number in engineering notation?  That is, scientific notation where the powers are constrained to multiples of three?

e.g. 23.456E15 instead of 2.3456E16

thanks,

firebird-sc
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firebird-scAsked:
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rsripracConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Use the following to format the number:

Format(myNumber, "##0.0E+0")


Where myNumber is the varible with the digit to format.
-Ram
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SjoerdVerweijCommented:
Which DBMS/language?
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firebird-scAuthor Commented:
Oops, sorry. Meant to file this under MS Access. VB is the language.
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Arthur_WoodCommented:
as far as I am aware, there is no automatic method in VB to force the display in 'Engineering' notation (in fact, asa Physics major, and thus very familiar with 'Scientific Notation', I personally have never heard of the 'engineering notation' that you describe).  Format(myNumber, "##0.0E+0")  will only show 'scientific notation', and will NOT force the exponent to be a factor of 3.  If this is an ABSOLUTE necessity, then you will need to write your own routine to get that type of exponential notation.

AW
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firebird-scAuthor Commented:
Engineering notation is more practical than scientific notation. It's meant to fit with the system of prefixes of SI units.  Consider 2.34E-2 Volts in scientific notation which becomes 23.4E-3 Volts in engineering notation, or 23.4 mV.  The practicality becomes apparent when you consider that most measuring devices have ranges based on these prefixes. A multimeter will give measurements in V, mV, uV, but not Vx10^-2.

rsriprac's suggestion will work well for me; I am measuring carrier concentration in semiconductor materials and we write all measurements in the E15 range.
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