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Linux permissions help

Posted on 2004-08-28
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Hi

I am a newbie and trying to figure out how the file permisions work:

I see Each file has a set of 3 permissions:

Access permissions
-Owner
-Group
-Others
Ownership
-User
-Group

and
Advanced permissions:
Class    show entries   write entries   enter    special
User      x                   x                    x
Group    x                   x
Others   x                                         x         x

and so on, please could someone explain this to me or point me to a good article on the permissions.

thx
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Question by:iqula
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4 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:grblades
ID: 11920588
Hi iqula,
This article is a good description of the basic file permissions:-
http://www.freeos.com/articles/3127/

The 'chmod' manual page (man chmod) also gives some usefull information.
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Expert Comment

by:grblades
ID: 11920602
This article gives additional infor on the s and t special permissions
http://www.linuxfocus.org/English/January1999/article77.html
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Author Comment

by:iqula
ID: 11920818
That clears things up a bit, are there any articles regarding setting up the filesystem so that I can lock it and the apps up as much as possible for a group of terminal users, ie an example setup?
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Accepted Solution

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grblades earned 2000 total points
ID: 11920848
I am not aware of any examples but Linux has always been a multi user system so the default permissions stop normal users from doing things they shouldn't. The only time you need to worry about things is if you need to give people extra permissions or enable them to run specific programs.
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