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Can I keep my Exchange 2000 server after I introduce another Windows 2003 server to the domain and upgrade it to a DC?

Posted on 2004-08-30
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I am working with the following scenario:
Server 1: A very old Windows 2000 server that is a domain controller, print server, Anti-virus server (needs to be replaced ASAP)
Server 2: Another somewhat old W2K server that is the other domain controller and file server
Server 3: A new W2K server w/ Exchange 2000 used as the mail server

I want to replace server 1 because it may die any day and I don't have any support contract on it. I just found out that the server I purchased IBM e-Server 325 (Opteron based) only supports W2003. I'm thinking, I could introduce the new server as a w2003 member server in the domain first. Move the print services and Anti-virus server to this server. Then run ADprep and promote it to a domain controller and remove the old W2K server. I don't want to upgrade Exchange 2000 right now as it is on a fairly new server. My question is: can I keep Exchange 2000 and still introduce a W2003 server and promote it to a domain contoller by running ADPrep?
I was also thinking, perhaps, I could upgrade server 2 to W2003 (in-place upgrade), run ADprep to upgrade AD to 2003, then do a clean W2003 install on the new server as a domain controller, then make the new server a file server and get rid of Server 2 since I only will have one W2003 license.

Please let me know what you consider the best course of action. Thanks for your advice, conmments in advance.
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Question by:Fodero
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Sembee earned 252 total points
ID: 11931909
Exchange 2000 will run quite happily in a Windows 2003 environment. All you will need to do is run the Windows 20003 prep tools - no need to run the Exchange tools again.

Thus...

Install new server as Windows 2003 member server.
Run forest and domain prep tools (wait 30 minutes between each stage and moving on to the next).
DCPROMO the Windows 2003 member server in to the domain.
Move whatever you need to the new machine. If it is a fairly beefy machine then make it a file and print server.

I don't see what doing an inplace upgrade will achieve and wouldn't even consider doing this in this environment.
Leave the domain in Windows 2003 mixed until you get the budget to upgrade. I have found that Windows 2003 has given a new lease of life to older machines. One client had a creaking Compaq ML370 G1 which I was able to install Windows 2003. It is now running quite happily as a domain controller and print server only.

Simon.
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by:jdeclue
jdeclue earned 248 total points
ID: 11932793
Please make sure you see this.. it is important

Windows Server 2003 adprep /forestprep Command Causes Mangled Attributes in Windows 2000 Forests That Contain Exchange 2000 Servers http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=314649&product=winsvr2003
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