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AD Sites

I have three subnets with two domains originally setup under NT4.  The first domain on subnet 1 was converted to Windows 2000 with Active Directory and DNS using two domain controllers. DC 1 is the Global Catalog server and DC2 is the Infrastructure Update Master.  Subnet 2 is at a remote site connected through a VPN router. This site has a DC (DC3) for servicing logon requests for their local users and simply supplies file services. This site belongs to the first domain.

Subnet 3 belongs to Domain #2.  I upgraded the DC (DC4) in the second domain and made it a child domain of Domain 1.

Should i have seperate AD sites for my main location (domain 1), my remote site (domain 1) and domain 2?  Right now I do (Site 1, Site 2 (remote site) Site 3 (second domain)). I setup the 3 subnets and assigned them to the corresponding AD sites?  
Should the remote network be under Site 1 since it belongs to the same domain?
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GPScribner
Asked:
GPScribner
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1 Solution
 
jdeclueCommented:
3 sites is perfect, even though it belongs to the same network, you want it seperated out becuase of the link speeds. You did it correctly. Good job!


J
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althomas101Commented:
The purpose of sites is to provide local authentication.  Only use a site if you have a wan connection or otherwise unreliable connection.  When you create a site make sure that you have a local DC for that site, and if you have multiple domains (or a local exchange server) a local GC as well.
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exx1976Commented:
Well, that all depends upon the location of Doman2.  You never said where it is.  You should use sites when:

You have physical networks which are separated by a slow link (Microsoft defines a slow link as a link that is slower than 256KB/s), or, when you have physical networks that are separated by a link that has less than 50% available bandwidth, or, when physical networks are separated by unreliable links.

So, if Domain2 is in the same building as one of the other sites, even if it is a different subnet, it should be in the same site.  Sites provide more than local authentication, they also control replication traffic.  I have three sites defined in my network, but I have 8 subnets and 5 domains...  We only have three physical locations, hence a need for only three sites..


HTH,
exx
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jdeclueCommented:
Yeah I missed that, I thought from the description that Domain A and B were seperated from HQ(Domain1). If Domain B is located with Domain 1, then you should only have two sites as althomas and exx1976 suggest.

J
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exx1976Commented:
I think I should receive the points for this question.  My answer was corroborated by other experts in this thread, it's not my fault the asker took the answer and ran...  This was a design level question, he received a valid, correct design level answer, and then never awarded the points..
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althomas101Commented:
Once again exxd1976 is correct that this is another rude user who doesn't have the decency to thank the participants. I would award the points to exx1976 because he expanded upon the design information I provided to help clarify the concept.
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exx1976Commented:
Thank you.
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GPScribnerAuthor Commented:
No problem.  I apologize for not awarding the points when you responded.  I haven't been to this site is quite awhile.  Sorry.
Thanks for the help!!
Greg
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