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REDHAT / Linux Serial Terminal Multi-Session Capabilities

Posted on 2004-08-30
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
Hi:  Does Redhat / Linus have any Multi Session Serial Terminal Capabilities?  This is the ability for the terminal to have 1-2-3-4 Login Sessions open at the same time and hotkey back and forth bethween them.  I know that some Terminal Servers have this ability and some Terminal To Host (Like DEC terminals to DEC / VMS Machines).  Does REDHAT / Linux offer this feature and if so, what are the requirements?

Thanks
Jeff Orthober
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Question by:ort11
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fim32 earned 500 total points
ID: 11933667
see gnu screen
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by:knollbert
ID: 11933796
Try
CTL-ALT-F[1-5]   eg CTL-ALT-F1
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by:owensleftfoot
ID: 11936322
As fim says, screen is the answer. From the manpage -

Screen is a full-screen window manager that multiplexes a physical
terminal between several processes, typically interactive shells.  Each
virtual terminal provides the functions of the DEC VT100 terminal and,
in addition, several control functions from the ISO 6429 (ECMA 48, ANSI
X3.64) and ISO 2022 standards (e.g. insert/delete line and support for
multiple character sets).  There is a scrollback history buffer for
each virtual terminal and a copy-and-paste mechanism that allows the
user to move text regions between windows.

   When `screen' is called, it creates a single window with a shell in
it (or the specified command) and then gets out of your way so that you
can use the program as you normally would.  Then, at any time, you can
create new (full-screen) windows with other programs in them (including
more shells), kill the current window, view a list of the active
windows, turn output logging on and off, copy text between windows, view
the scrollback history, switch between windows, etc.  All windows run
their programs completely independent of each other.  Programs continue
to run when their window is currently not visible and even when the
whole screen session is detached from the user's terminal.

   When a program terminates, `screen' (per default) kills the window
that contained it.  If this window was in the foreground, the display
switches to the previously displayed window; if none are left, `screen'
exits.

   Everything you type is sent to the program running in the current
window.  The only exception to this is the one keystroke that is used to
initiate a command to the window manager.  By default, each command
begins with a control-a (abbreviated `C-a' from now on), and is
followed by one other keystroke.  The command character (*note Command
Character::.) and all the key bindings (Note: Key Binding.) can be
fully customized to be anything you like, though they are always two
characters in length.

   `Screen' does not understand the prefix `C-' to mean control.
Please use the caret notation (`^A' instead of `C-a') as arguments to
e.g. the `escape' command or the `-e' option. `Screen' will also print
out control characters in caret notation.

   The standard way to create a new window is to type `C-a c'.  This
creates a new window running a shell and switches to that window
immediately, regardless of the state of the process running in the
current window.  Similarly, you can create a new window with a custom
command in it by first binding the command to a keystroke (in your
`.screenrc' file or at the `C-a :' command line) and then using it just
like the `C-a c' command.  In addition, new windows can be created by
running a command like:

     screen emacs prog.c

from a shell prompt within a previously created window.  This will not
run another copy of `screen', but will instead supply the command name
and its arguments to the window manager (specified in the $STY
environment variable) who will use it to create the new window.  The
above example would start the `emacs' editor (editing `prog.c') and
switch to its window.

   If `/etc/utmp' is writable by `screen', an appropriate record will
be written to this file for each window, and removed when the window is
closed.  This is useful for working with `talk', `script', `shutdown',
`rsend', `sccs' and other similar programs that use the utmp file to
determine who you are. As long as `screen' is active on your terminal,
the terminal's own record is removed from the utmp file.  
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