Solved

When to replace a Network laser printer

Posted on 2004-08-30
5
325 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-26
I have this old HP network laser printer (LaserJet 4M Plus) that I am getting maintenance quotes for.  

How should I determine whether to purchase a new laser printer, or continue to perform small maintenance ($40 here, $40 there)?  Is there a percentage I should go by in choosing whether to purchase maintenance or buying a new printer, such as a percentage of what it would cost me to purchase a new laser printer?  

I don't want repeat maintenance fees to stack up on an old printer when spending $800 - $1000 on a new one might be a more cost effective option.  Can someone advise on this?
0
Comment
Question by:cakirfatih
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
5 Comments
 
LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
LimeSMJ earned 300 total points
ID: 11936682
I just replaced one of these tanks in our office last December.  It was a great printer with very little problems.  The justification of buying a new printer was that the printer itself was well over HP's support cycle - it was discontinued in May of 94.  Support and parts were pretty expensive, especially since all the parts I got were remanufactured because HP wasn't making any more.  In addition, because the parts were not made by HP, the print quality dropped (a lot of bad toner, low duty cycle drums, etc).

Some other factors that influenced me was the sheer size of the thing, limited memory to do large prints, and also the printing speed - subjective comparison to our newer laser printers of course.  I loved how this printer dimmed the lights of the room that it was in while it printed or power cycled too - which is another reason why I opted to replace... used too much juice.  Newer printers are much more efficient.

Ultimately, the options and speed of the newer laser printers out there outweighed the reliability of that 4m.  In general, from experience, if you can squeeze out 700,000 pages from a printer, that's pretty damn good.
0
 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:cwisofsky
cwisofsky earned 50 total points
ID: 11938593
I use a ratio for most hardware of cost of a new printer divided by four years of service.  If the repair kits stay under about $300 ($1200 for new printer) then I continue to buy them until the annual cost exceeds that ratio.  If the user needs a new printer for features, just relocate the older printer to an area that can survive with the Laserjet 4 as their workhorse.

Also, I go 2 or 3 years in most cases between maintenance kits while HP's recommendation is to replace them annually or after the workload in sheets of the printer.  That gives me a very nice ROI and hasn't let any of my users down yet.

Last thing, don't include consumables like toner in any of these ratios unless the toner price really gets expensive.

0
 
LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:mcp_jon
ID: 11939794
For that budget you could buy the new HP Laserjet 4200, which is fast enough, and not very expensive ! Also buy the Jet Direct and just plug it on your Network. Done !

This printer prints PCL as well as PostScript.

Best Regards
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:Hammadian2
ID: 11939967
if the maintnance cost u'r talking about is spent on buying ink cartridges
then dont buy a new one for sure :)
as it will also need ink :))

Laser printers usually do not need much maintenance, if they need at all
0
 
LVL 1

Assisted Solution

by:DJ_Zeratul
DJ_Zeratul earned 150 total points
ID: 11951261
I would also recommend the LaserJet 4200, we just bought a new one for our office and it has been bulletproof so far.

Anyway, to your question, I had to make the same decision, basicaly I use a 15% depreciation per year formula and then weigh the cost of a repair. If the repairs for a year cost more than the depreciated value, then I make a comment to our project administrators and they usually agree that it is time for a new piece of hardware.
0

Featured Post

Ransomware: The New Cyber Threat & How to Stop It

This infographic explains ransomware, type of malware that blocks access to your files or your systems and holds them hostage until a ransom is paid. It also examines the different types of ransomware and explains what you can do to thwart this sinister online threat.  

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This is about my first experience with programming Arduino.
What do we know about Legacy Video Conferencing? - Full IT support needed! - Complicated systems at outrageous prices! - Intense training required! Highfive believes we need to embrace a new alternative.
Exchange organizations may use the Journaling Agent of the Transport Service to archive messages going through Exchange. However, if the Transport Service is integrated with some email content management application (such as an antispam), the admini…
Finding and deleting duplicate (picture) files can be a time consuming task. My wife and I, our three kids and their families all share one dilemma: Managing our pictures. Between desktops, laptops, phones, tablets, and cameras; over the last decade…
Suggested Courses

738 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question