Solved

CAN'T BOOT and all I see is a screen that says:

Posted on 2004-08-30
23
1,016 Views
Last Modified: 2008-02-01
When booting to XP Pro all I get is a screen that says, something but it goes so quick all I have been able to get is something about Physical Memory Dump and it returns to a screen that says:  Sorry for the inconvenience, blah, blah, blah and then asks you to choose start up options from Start Windows Normally to Last know configuration and then offers some options for safe mode, none of which does anything but boot to the same screen which is a small blue one with white writing and all I can catch is something about a physical memory dump...then it goes to re-boot so I am stuck in this cycle can't get to any safe mode or anything.
0
Comment
Question by:ReynaldoAlbert
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • +2
23 Comments
 
LVL 65

Expert Comment

by:SheharyaarSaahil
Comment Utility
Hello ReynaldoAlbert =)

ur system is producing a BSOD, and BSODs are caused by either defective hardware or incompatible drivers....

did u install any new hardware or updated any drivers or windows ??

try unplugging all external devices, and un-neccessary cards.... and if possible take out the RAM sticks if u are using more that one... and try with one at a time,,,, and if using only one, then swap it with another stick to check for the problem ??

Truobleshooting STOP Error Messages(BSOD) in XP:

http://www.theeldergeek.com/stop_error_messages.htm
http://aumha.org/win5/kbestop.php
http://www.kellys-korner-xp.com/win_xp_stop.htm

!! GOOD LUCK !!
0
 
LVL 65

Expert Comment

by:SheharyaarSaahil
Comment Utility
and if hardware troubleshooting cannot solve the problem for u,,,,, then repair ur current XP installtion to solve the issue.

How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade (Reinstallation) of Windows XP:
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=315341

Or this site explains a Repair with pics: (Click on How To Run a Repair Install)
http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/repair_xp.htm
0
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
Comment Utility
WHy not just try this

How Do I Do a "Repair Installation"?
http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_repair_install.htm

Repair
How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade (Reinstallation) of Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;315341

Visual aid to the above procedure
http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/repair_xp.htm
Click on How To Run a Repair Install

You May Lose Data or Program Settings After Reinstalling, Repairing, or Upgrading Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;312369

Data Loss May Occur After Reinstalling, Repairing, or Upgrading Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;312368
0
 

Author Comment

by:ReynaldoAlbert
Comment Utility
The hard drive had the os installed in another laptop that is different because I  do not have a bootable drive, I have just been offered the use of a Parallel Port CD ROM can that be booted from, my BIOS supports booting from an external device it just won't from my usb cdrw  HELP !
0
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
Comment Utility
Then take a look at this


http://www.zrsss.si/~jack/7berror.html

Swapping Motherboards Under Windows XP
http://www.extremetech.com/print_article/0,3428,a=23979,00.asp
0
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
Comment Utility
For the hard disk drivers

Click Start and then click Control Panel.
Change the Control Panel to Classic View and then double click on the System icon.
In the System Properties dialog box, click on the Hardware tab and then click on the Device Manager button.
In the Device Manager window, find the IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers line and expand it. You'll see something like Intel 82371AB/ED PCI Bus Master IDE Controller (note that yours may have a different manufacturer - it's the first one in the list). Right click on the controller and click Update Driver.
The Welcome to the Hardware Update Wizard page appears. Click on the Install from a list or specific location (Advanced) option and click Next.
On the Please choose your search and installation options page, select the Don't search. I will choose the driver to install option and click Next.
On the Select the device driver you want to install for this hardware page, click on the Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller entry and click Next.
You will be asked for your Windows XP disk. Put your CD into the drive and point the Wizard to the right location. Or, if you have the installation files on your hard disk, point the Wizard to the location on your hard disk where the installation files are located. Click Finish when the wizard completes the installation of the new drive.
You'll be asked if you want to restart the computer. Click No and shut down the machine. Remove the disk and install it in your new computer!

Take a look at this MS KB

How to Move a Windows XP Installation to Different Hardware
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;nl;314070

BEGIN ARTICLE

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:

Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
Microsoft Windows XP Professional
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
For a Microsoft Windows 2000 version of this article, see 249694.

IMPORTANT : The issues that are discussed in this article and in the linked articles are the most common problems and limitations that you may encounter when you try to restore a backup copy to different hardware. Other issues can also appear because of the variations in software and hardware configurations. You may be able to resolve any of these issues by troubleshooting the specific problems that occur, but compatibility issues may limit the success of the restore of a backup to dissimilar hardware.

Samenvatting
This article describes how to move an installation of Windows XP to new, upgraded, or just different hardware. By using this information, you can:
Migrate a working Windows XP operating system and your installed programs to a different or more powerful computer in minimal downtime.
Replace a small system/boot disk drive with a larger system/boot disk drive.
Restore a Windows backup from a malfunctioning computer to a different computer for disaster recovery purposes.
Meer informatie
Windows Backup (Ntbackup.exe) can handle differences in hardware configuration information between computers and maintain critical registry entries that are unique to the computer to which you are migrating information. This capability means that you can migrate to new hardware by performing a full backup of the source computer and then restoring the backup over a fresh installation of Windows XP on the destination computer.

Ntbackup.exe handles restore operations in the registry by first querying the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\BackupRestore\KeysNotToRestore

This registry key indicates to Ntbackup.exe that certain registry keys under the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM key should not be overwritten when files are restored.

An entry that ends with a backslash (\) indicates that a key is protected and that any keys or values under that key should not be restored. If the entry ends with a backslash and an asterisk (\*), all subkeys are "merged." In this situation, "merged" means comparing the start values of the keys in the backup set with the start values that exist in the current registry, to determine the correct key to restore.

If the value of the key on the backup set has a lower start value, the backup key takes precedence. If the value of the key in the current registry has a lower start value, the current key takes precedence. This process ensures that all services and devices start correctly after a "system state" restoration, even on dissimilar hardware.

For example: If the value of the following key on the backup set has a lower start value, the backup key takes precedence:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Dhcp

If the value of the same key in the current registry has a lower start value than the key you want to restore, the current key takes precedence.                 Original System   New System: Before Restore  After Restore
   ========================================================================
   DHCP Running:      YES                          NO             YES
   DHCP Running:      NO                           YES            YES  
   DHCP Running:      NO                           NO             NO
After the computer successfully restarts, Windows Plug and Play takes care of any minor differences in hardware configuration.
The Factors to Consider Before You Use This Procedure
Drive Letters and the %SystemRoot% Folder
For a complete migration to work correctly, the %SystemRoot% folder (the Windows folder in Windows XP) and the drive letters for any (target) volumes that contain a system-state component must be the same on both the source computer and the destination computer. This means that if the source computer has, for example, Windows XP Professional installed in the C:\Windows folder and has Active Directory (NTDS) and SYSVOL on separate drives, drive D and drive E respectively, the destination computer must have Windows XP pre-installed in a C:\Windows folder and contain drives D and E before the restore operation can succeed.
Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL)
The HALs on both of the computers should be the same. This means that the source and destination computers should be using the same HAL type to achieve favorable results. Although this is not a requirement, the computer may not perform migration properly if the HALs do not match.

To determine the type of HAL that you are using on each computer:
Click Start , click Control Panel , and then double-click System .
On the Hardware tab, click Device Manager , and then view the listing under Computer . Possible values for the system description and the associated HAL include:
ACPI Multiprocessor PC = Halmacpi.dll
ACPI Uniprocessor PC = Halaacpi.dll
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC = Halacpi.dll
MPS Multiprocessor PC = Halmps.dll
MPS Uniprocessor PC = Halapic.dll
Standard PC = Hal.dll
Compaq SystemPro Multiprocessor or 100% Compatible = Halsp.dll

The Windows\Repair Folder
The Windows\Repair folder that contains your source computer hardware and software configuration files and the Setup.log file may not be valid for the new hardware on the destination computer to which you restored them. You should perform an in-place upgrade on the destination computer to update these files so that you can make the appropriate repairs in the future if necessary.
NTFS Volumes
You may need to start special filter drivers before you can restore files that contain reparse points to NTFS volumes. This means that before you can restore these types of files, you need to restart the computer after you restore the operating system. Examples of these types of files include Remote Installation Services (RIS) images that rely on Single Instance Storage (SIS), Remote Storage Server (RSS) files that you are restoring to managed volumes, or other third-party services that use reparse points and require filter drivers.
The Procedure for Moving a Windows Installation
On the destination computer, perform a new installation of Windows, using the product type that matches that of the source computer. Ensure that the drive letter and %SystemRoot% folder names match those on the source computer.
Using Disk Management, create, format, and assign drive letters to any additional volumes that may be required to hold a system-state component (for example, SYSVOL, Active Directory, or Active Directory Log files). Ensure that all drive letters match those on the source computer. For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
307844 HOW TO: Change Drive Letter Assignments in Windows XP

For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: On the source computer, log on as Administrator, and then stop all the non-essential services that you normally stop before performing a backup.
For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: Using Ntbackup.exe, back up the system\boot volume, the system state, and associated NTDS and SYSVOL volumes, if applicable. For additional information about how to perform a backup, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
308422 HOW TO: Use Backup to Back Up Files and Folders on Your Computer

For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: On the destination computer, log on as Administrator. If the system that you want to restore is a destination computer, you must restart the computer, press F8 during startup, and then click Directory Services Restore Mode before you log on as Administrator.
For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: Start Ntbackup.exe, click Options on the Tools menu, click the Restore tab, and then click Always replace the file on my computer . Restore the system\boot volume, the system state, and associated volumes from the backup that you performed previously. Make sure that you select the option to restore them to "original location" in the backup program. For additional information about how to restore, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
309340 HOW TO: Use Backup to Restore Files and Folders on Your Computer

NOTE : To have access to all removable media (tape or magneto-optic [MO] disk) from the source computer after the full system restore is complete, you must also click Restore Removable Storage Database under Advanced before you begin the restore.


For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: After the full restoration finishes, and before you restart the destination computer, make sure that the computer is disconnected from the network, to avoid conflicts.
For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: Restart the computer.
If the computer does not restart after restoration because of HAL mismatches, you can start from the Windows installation disk to perform an in-place installation or repair. This type of repair occurs after you accept the licensing agreement, and Setup searches for previous versions to repair. When the installation that is damaged or needs repair is found, press R to repair the selected installation. Setup re-enumerates your computer's hardware (including the HAL) and performs an in-place upgrade while maintaining your programs and user settings. This also refreshes the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder with accurate information that you can use for normal repairs.
If the computer does restart after the restoration, log on as Administrator and initiate an in-place upgrade by running Winnt32.exe from the i386 folder on the Windows CD-ROM. This refreshes the Setup.log and registry files in the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder, and ensures that the proper HAL is in use.
Note that in Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, user profiles are stored as a subfolder of the %SystemRoot%\Profiles folder. In Windows XP, if the installation is an upgrade, the existing profile path continues to be used. In new Windows XP installations, a Documents and Settings folder is created on the same volume as the Windows XP installation, to hold user profiles. If the original system was an upgrade from Windows NT, the original profiles will be used after the restore. However, if an in-place upgrade is performed, you may need to change the profiles' path in the registry back to %SystemRoot%\Profiles by modifying the keys under the following path:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: After the upgrade is finished and you are certain that everything works, you can remove the source (original) computer from the network and connect the destination (new) computer in its place.
NOTE : The difference between the time of the backup and the time of the restoration to the new computer may affect the machine account on the domain controller. You may have to join a workgroup first, and then rejoin the domain.

For additional information about re-activation after the restore, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
305356 Windows XP Prompts You to Re-activate After You Restore Your Computer

For information about how to install Ntbackup on a computer that runs Windows XP Home Edition, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
302894 HOW TO: Install Backup from the Windows XP Home Edition CD-ROM

De informatie in dit artikel is van toepassing op:
Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
Microsoft Windows XP Professional

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Published Jan 11 2002 1:34PM  Issue Type kbinfo  
Last Modifed Apr 5 2002 6:58PM  Additional Query Words stop 0x79 pnp transfer new hard drive  
Keywords kbenv kbsetup  

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. Copyright 2002 Microsoft Corporation, One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 U.S.A. All rights reserved.
 
END  ARTICLE
0
 
LVL 65

Expert Comment

by:SheharyaarSaahil
Comment Utility
>> I have just been offered the use of a Parallel Port CD ROM can that be booted from, my BIOS supports booting from an external device

Ok then set the boot order to boot from the External Device first, then plug the CD drive, insert the WinXP CD, restart and check if ur system is booting with the CD or not ??
0
 

Author Comment

by:ReynaldoAlbert
Comment Utility
it is a bootable xp pro, it also can do repairs I have used it, but my problem is that I can't boot up at all not in safe mode or anything, I have no bootable drive, I am hoping to get a parallel port cd rom and if it will boot to that then I can use the repair on the xp pro cd, I am waiting for someone to come over with the parallel cd, if he doesn't show up I am thinking I will reinstall xp on the hard drive in the other laptop again and then carefully follow all the instructions so that I make the adjustments and load only the drivers I need, etc.. any suggestions?
0
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
Comment Utility
>>>it is a bootable xp pro,

Then you have a problem overalll with your machine or your system is set to boot from the CD.
0
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
Comment Utility
your system is set to boot from the CD. = your system is set not to boot from the CD.
0
 

Author Comment

by:ReynaldoAlbert
Comment Utility
I am trying to log onto a laptop that has no bootable drives, I loaded the OS onto the hard drive using another laptop one is an hp omnibook 4150 P2 500 Mhz speed step, the other (No bootable drives) is an hp omnibook 500 P3 700 Mhz, the 500 is the one that I have the problem with, because it has no bootable drives, I am stuck in this error mode and can't get the system back up at all, so I think either I should do a re-install or try to repair it in the other laptop, but then this would be the 3rd time I had to recover the system this way, should I do a complete re-install?  If this guy shows up and I am able to boot to the Parallel Port CD Rom then I will just re-format the hard drive and do a fresh install on the 500.  Any suggestions, warnings, cautions would be appreciated!
0
How to run any project with ease

Manage projects of all sizes how you want. Great for personal to-do lists, project milestones, team priorities and launch plans.
- Combine task lists, docs, spreadsheets, and chat in one
- View and edit from mobile/offline
- Cut down on emails

 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
Comment Utility
WHy does not this system have a bootable drive? Excuse me for saying so but all systems have a bootable drive. Are you saying it can't boot from the CD drive or the Floppy drive? If so that is nonsense. Are you saying it does not have either of these drives, if so how do propose you installl the OS. Come on you need to be more forth coming with the problem you  are facing. Give us the details all the way down to what you are trying to hold back, we don't care, just help us out.
0
 

Author Comment

by:ReynaldoAlbert
Comment Utility
This is a 2.8 pound sub-notebook in which the bootable drives are located in the docking station, which I left in Italy when I flew here a few weeks ago, in the meantime, I had a problem with my hard drive and bought a new one, thinking I could boot from my USB 2.0 CDRW External drive, but it is not bootable even though my boot sequence has external drives in it, it requires a pcmcia or the proprietary connection for the omnibook which is a small scsi looking connection for the external drives that would come with the notebook if you did not purchase the docking station, so here I sit with no bootable drive for the notebook I am carrrying and no os on the operating system.  So I have been trying a variety of techniques all to no avail until I loaded the OS on the hard drive in an omnibook 4150 which is p2 500 mhz and it works but just when I have all the drivers and my software all loaded, the damned thing keeps crashing.  A variety of crashes thusfar, and I have each time re-installed the OS on the hard drive in the ob4150  then I put it in the omnibook 500 which is p3 700 mhz.  So if you have any suggestions let me know please!
0
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
Comment Utility
>>>So I have been trying a variety of techniques all to no avail until I loaded the OS on the hard drive in an omnibook 4150 which is p2 500 mhz and it works but just when I have all the drivers and my software all loaded, the damned thing keeps crashing.

Ummm and what did you expect. Geesh i keep telling you need a bootable device to boot to the XP CD. It seems that it does to recognize your USB device so what else do you think will solve the problem. Ummm no if the CD does not boot or the floppy or the USB just moving HD's just will not do it. Sorry. I think you are out of luck. Why get a machine that does not have a  CD/DVD/ or Floppy? Makes no sense to me. You neeed at least one to even get to network install. Geesh my freind what did you really expect here. I mean you have nothing to work with.
0
 
LVL 44

Accepted Solution

by:
CrazyOne earned 500 total points
Comment Utility
Install a new motherboard in a Windows 2000/XP system.

http://www.zrsss.si/~jack/7berror.html

Swapping Motherboards Under Windows XP
http://www.extremetech.com/print_article/0,3428,a=23979,00.asp

For the hard disk drivers

Click Start and then click Control Panel.
Change the Control Panel to Classic View and then double click on the System icon.
In the System Properties dialog box, click on the Hardware tab and then click on the Device Manager button.
In the Device Manager window, find the IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers line and expand it. You'll see something like Intel 82371AB/ED PCI Bus Master IDE Controller (note that yours may have a different manufacturer - it's the first one in the list). Right click on the controller and click Update Driver.
The Welcome to the Hardware Update Wizard page appears. Click on the Install from a list or specific location (Advanced) option and click Next.
On the Please choose your search and installation options page, select the Don't search. I will choose the driver to install option and click Next.
On the Select the device driver you want to install for this hardware page, click on the Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller entry and click Next.
You will be asked for your Windows XP disk. Put your CD into the drive and point the Wizard to the right location. Or, if you have the installation files on your hard disk, point the Wizard to the location on your hard disk where the installation files are located. Click Finish when the wizard completes the installation of the new drive.
You'll be asked if you want to restart the computer. Click No and shut down the machine. Remove the disk and install it in your new computer!

Take a look at this MS KB

How to Move a Windows XP Installation to Different Hardware
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;nl;314070

BEGIN ARTICLE

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:

Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
Microsoft Windows XP Professional
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
For a Microsoft Windows 2000 version of this article, see 249694.

IMPORTANT : The issues that are discussed in this article and in the linked articles are the most common problems and limitations that you may encounter when you try to restore a backup copy to different hardware. Other issues can also appear because of the variations in software and hardware configurations. You may be able to resolve any of these issues by troubleshooting the specific problems that occur, but compatibility issues may limit the success of the restore of a backup to dissimilar hardware.

Samenvatting
This article describes how to move an installation of Windows XP to new, upgraded, or just different hardware. By using this information, you can:
Migrate a working Windows XP operating system and your installed programs to a different or more powerful computer in minimal downtime.
Replace a small system/boot disk drive with a larger system/boot disk drive.
Restore a Windows backup from a malfunctioning computer to a different computer for disaster recovery purposes.
Meer informatie
Windows Backup (Ntbackup.exe) can handle differences in hardware configuration information between computers and maintain critical registry entries that are unique to the computer to which you are migrating information. This capability means that you can migrate to new hardware by performing a full backup of the source computer and then restoring the backup over a fresh installation of Windows XP on the destination computer.

Ntbackup.exe handles restore operations in the registry by first querying the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\BackupRestore\KeysNotToRestore

This registry key indicates to Ntbackup.exe that certain registry keys under the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM key should not be overwritten when files are restored.

An entry that ends with a backslash (\) indicates that a key is protected and that any keys or values under that key should not be restored. If the entry ends with a backslash and an asterisk (\*), all subkeys are "merged." In this situation, "merged" means comparing the start values of the keys in the backup set with the start values that exist in the current registry, to determine the correct key to restore.

If the value of the key on the backup set has a lower start value, the backup key takes precedence. If the value of the key in the current registry has a lower start value, the current key takes precedence. This process ensures that all services and devices start correctly after a "system state" restoration, even on dissimilar hardware.

For example: If the value of the following key on the backup set has a lower start value, the backup key takes precedence:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Dhcp

If the value of the same key in the current registry has a lower start value than the key you want to restore, the current key takes precedence.                 Original System   New System: Before Restore  After Restore
   ========================================================================
   DHCP Running:      YES                          NO             YES
   DHCP Running:      NO                           YES            YES  
   DHCP Running:      NO                           NO             NO
After the computer successfully restarts, Windows Plug and Play takes care of any minor differences in hardware configuration.
The Factors to Consider Before You Use This Procedure
Drive Letters and the %SystemRoot% Folder
For a complete migration to work correctly, the %SystemRoot% folder (the Windows folder in Windows XP) and the drive letters for any (target) volumes that contain a system-state component must be the same on both the source computer and the destination computer. This means that if the source computer has, for example, Windows XP Professional installed in the C:\Windows folder and has Active Directory (NTDS) and SYSVOL on separate drives, drive D and drive E respectively, the destination computer must have Windows XP pre-installed in a C:\Windows folder and contain drives D and E before the restore operation can succeed.
Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL)
The HALs on both of the computers should be the same. This means that the source and destination computers should be using the same HAL type to achieve favorable results. Although this is not a requirement, the computer may not perform migration properly if the HALs do not match.

To determine the type of HAL that you are using on each computer:
Click Start , click Control Panel , and then double-click System .
On the Hardware tab, click Device Manager , and then view the listing under Computer . Possible values for the system description and the associated HAL include:
ACPI Multiprocessor PC = Halmacpi.dll
ACPI Uniprocessor PC = Halaacpi.dll
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC = Halacpi.dll
MPS Multiprocessor PC = Halmps.dll
MPS Uniprocessor PC = Halapic.dll
Standard PC = Hal.dll
Compaq SystemPro Multiprocessor or 100% Compatible = Halsp.dll

The Windows\Repair Folder
The Windows\Repair folder that contains your source computer hardware and software configuration files and the Setup.log file may not be valid for the new hardware on the destination computer to which you restored them. You should perform an in-place upgrade on the destination computer to update these files so that you can make the appropriate repairs in the future if necessary.
NTFS Volumes
You may need to start special filter drivers before you can restore files that contain reparse points to NTFS volumes. This means that before you can restore these types of files, you need to restart the computer after you restore the operating system. Examples of these types of files include Remote Installation Services (RIS) images that rely on Single Instance Storage (SIS), Remote Storage Server (RSS) files that you are restoring to managed volumes, or other third-party services that use reparse points and require filter drivers.
The Procedure for Moving a Windows Installation
On the destination computer, perform a new installation of Windows, using the product type that matches that of the source computer. Ensure that the drive letter and %SystemRoot% folder names match those on the source computer.
Using Disk Management, create, format, and assign drive letters to any additional volumes that may be required to hold a system-state component (for example, SYSVOL, Active Directory, or Active Directory Log files). Ensure that all drive letters match those on the source computer. For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
307844 HOW TO: Change Drive Letter Assignments in Windows XP

For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: On the source computer, log on as Administrator, and then stop all the non-essential services that you normally stop before performing a backup.
For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: Using Ntbackup.exe, back up the system\boot volume, the system state, and associated NTDS and SYSVOL volumes, if applicable. For additional information about how to perform a backup, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
308422 HOW TO: Use Backup to Back Up Files and Folders on Your Computer

For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: On the destination computer, log on as Administrator. If the system that you want to restore is a destination computer, you must restart the computer, press F8 during startup, and then click Directory Services Restore Mode before you log on as Administrator.
For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: Start Ntbackup.exe, click Options on the Tools menu, click the Restore tab, and then click Always replace the file on my computer . Restore the system\boot volume, the system state, and associated volumes from the backup that you performed previously. Make sure that you select the option to restore them to "original location" in the backup program. For additional information about how to restore, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
309340 HOW TO: Use Backup to Restore Files and Folders on Your Computer

NOTE : To have access to all removable media (tape or magneto-optic [MO] disk) from the source computer after the full system restore is complete, you must also click Restore Removable Storage Database under Advanced before you begin the restore.


For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: After the full restoration finishes, and before you restart the destination computer, make sure that the computer is disconnected from the network, to avoid conflicts.
For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: Restart the computer.
If the computer does not restart after restoration because of HAL mismatches, you can start from the Windows installation disk to perform an in-place installation or repair. This type of repair occurs after you accept the licensing agreement, and Setup searches for previous versions to repair. When the installation that is damaged or needs repair is found, press R to repair the selected installation. Setup re-enumerates your computer's hardware (including the HAL) and performs an in-place upgrade while maintaining your programs and user settings. This also refreshes the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder with accurate information that you can use for normal repairs.
If the computer does restart after the restoration, log on as Administrator and initiate an in-place upgrade by running Winnt32.exe from the i386 folder on the Windows CD-ROM. This refreshes the Setup.log and registry files in the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder, and ensures that the proper HAL is in use.
Note that in Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, user profiles are stored as a subfolder of the %SystemRoot%\Profiles folder. In Windows XP, if the installation is an upgrade, the existing profile path continues to be used. In new Windows XP installations, a Documents and Settings folder is created on the same volume as the Windows XP installation, to hold user profiles. If the original system was an upgrade from Windows NT, the original profiles will be used after the restore. However, if an in-place upgrade is performed, you may need to change the profiles' path in the registry back to %SystemRoot%\Profiles by modifying the keys under the following path:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList

For additional information about drive letter assignments,, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: After the upgrade is finished and you are certain that everything works, you can remove the source (original) computer from the network and connect the destination (new) computer in its place.
NOTE : The difference between the time of the backup and the time of the restoration to the new computer may affect the machine account on the domain controller. You may have to join a workgroup first, and then rejoin the domain.

For additional information about re-activation after the restore, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
305356 Windows XP Prompts You to Re-activate After You Restore Your Computer

For information about how to install Ntbackup on a computer that runs Windows XP Home Edition, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
302894 HOW TO: Install Backup from the Windows XP Home Edition CD-ROM

De informatie in dit artikel is van toepassing op:
Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
Microsoft Windows XP Professional

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Published Jan 11 2002 1:34PM  Issue Type kbinfo  
Last Modifed Apr 5 2002 6:58PM  Additional Query Words stop 0x79 pnp transfer new hard drive  
Keywords kbenv kbsetup  

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. Copyright 2002 Microsoft Corporation, One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 U.S.A. All rights reserved.
 
END  ARTICLE/pro/using/itpro/deploying/introduction.asp
0
 
LVL 65

Expert Comment

by:SheharyaarSaahil
Comment Utility
ReynaldoAlbert...... i can only wish u Good Luck for getting a paralled CDROM for booting ur system with it..... otherwise CO has already given the instructions on How to Carefully Move an Installation between Different Hardwares :)

!! Good Luck !!
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:youre1m
Comment Utility
Put the HDD back into the machine you built it with. Firstly go into device manager and ensure your IDE controllers are set to standard IDE controller (as mentioned by Crazyone), if they are advanced or ultra blah blah blah then update the driver, and manually select the standard IDE controller driver.

Now try booting again, you will probably find that the HDD will now boot. If not, you could try running sysprep on the machine so that it renumerates all PNP devices on first boot when in the intended machine. To do that, put HDD back into working laptop, insert XP cd, browse to cd:\support and extract deploy.cab to c:\sysprep on the HDD. Now go to the newly extracted folder, double click sysprep.exe, select plug and play and mini setup boxes and click reseal, with shut down as the option. Now put the HDD back into the machine that previously wouldn;t boot and you should be working. Beware that running sysprep will require you to re-activate your XP, so be sure to have the product key to hand when you first boot up.
0
 

Author Comment

by:ReynaldoAlbert
Comment Utility
Okay, well for an update, I am posting this right now using the omnibook 500 I have had so much trouble with.  First of all I waited until well after midnight for someone who promised they were coming by my flat with the parallel port CD Rom, and he never showed up or even gave the courtesy of a call.  But none the less, left in a lurch as I was, I placed the 20GB Hard Drive into a 2.0 usb enclosure and hooked it to my other laptop then I formatted the hard drive.  Next, I removed it from the enclosure and swapped it out with the omnibook 4150 again, then I booted to the xp pro cd, when it came up I let it completely re-format the entire hard drive one more time, in the NTFS format, then I proceeded to do a clean install of xp pro, as soon as it was finished I removed it placed back in the omnibook 500 and it booted up.  Now I immediately went to the system files as recommended by crazyone and I opened the IDE ATI/ATAPI Adapter controller or whatever, I did it step by step as per crazyone, and did the update driver, someone else I know, told me before I installed a bunch of drivers or downloaded things from hp, I should simply go into the device manager and see what, if any conflicts I have.  He said it would show a yellow circle with an exclamation point if there was any problem with anything.  I did this and am familiar with the yellow circle with the exclamation mark, so I knew what to look for, and surprise, NOT ONE SINGLE THING had a conflict or wasn't working properly, after expanding each item to be sure I also right clicked and brought up the screen for updating drivers, etc.  Now I am about to re-install all my software programs.  Here is my next question before I close this out hopfully for good, I have been told that I am loading too much software, and doing so straight away, like one after the other, right after just loading the OS, is this possible?  I have seven adobe programs I load also a MACROMEDIA and then Logitec for my mouse, NETGEAR for my wireless card, Office XP Pro and then I take an external usb 2.0 hard disk enclosure, plug it in and load all my backed up files.  So any suggestions, so far I have done only the Logitec for my traveler mouse, and NETGEAR for my wi-fi card, I also need to install, relatively quick, my Ring Central Answering Service which is done on line, and I need to download AIM and Yahoo Messenger as I use both of these for my PC to Phone communications.  Now all the Adobe software and MACROMEDIA things can wait   NO URGENCY, I can do them once a day as it becomes needed, which would probably spread them out over a week, but the RING CENTRAL, Office XP Pro, and AIM/Yahoo PC to Phone devices which come from downloads on line, I have to do within the next hour or so as I need to get back to work, any suggestions, cautions, etc....Should I download any of the drivers from hp or not, since only after doing so did I have a problem the last 2 or 3 times I have done this, in the last few days, maybe I should wait to see if anything is actually needed?  Also, on this occasion I did a clean install and removed all files by doing a complet formatting of the hard drive....maybe by doing the install over the other one on the last occasion I caused myself some problems?  Also I have been using system mechanic and I may have damaged the registry by removing some files it brought up as possible candidates for removal  What do you think?  Suggestions are greatly appreciated.  
0
 

Author Comment

by:ReynaldoAlbert
Comment Utility
Just was loading some of the initial items I mentioned previously and switched from my wi-fi card to my Ethernet cable from the router, and I don't even know if this is related but I got the following error, which really did not affect anything so far but here it is:

BackWeb-8876480.exe has encountered a problem and needs to close.  We are sorry for the

inconvenience
 Details:

C:\DOCUME~1\Rey\LOCALS~1\Temp\WER1.tmp.dir00\appcompat.txt
0
 
LVL 65

Expert Comment

by:SheharyaarSaahil
Comment Utility
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:MrRooster
Comment Utility
It looks like you've sorted the problem, but if you ever have to do this in future, with the HD installed in the other laptop copy the XP setup files (\i386) to the harddisc, and then start setup from the HD. When the computer reboots for the first time (before the main portion of setup), power off the laptop and move the HD back into the machine you want XP setup on. When the computer boots XP setup will continue and XP should be installed correctly (as the device detection part is carried out during the second stage of install, the first just copies files to the install folders on your HD and sets NTLDR to boot setup when the computer restarts.

Hope that's some use in future.
0
 

Author Comment

by:ReynaldoAlbert
Comment Utility
crazyjoe, I am on the third install of this hard drive from the other device, now, I have started following the entire lengthy procedure you have so graciously researched for me, it seems the obvious solution, now then if you would be so kind, I have handled the first sector wherein I changed the driver for the IDE ATAPI Controllers etc.. I have checked and double checked and am quite confident I have done this correctly.   Now I am going to bed and in the morning I will attempt to move on, I have studied everything, read it three or four times, and have a few questions, First I am fortunate I imagine as it seems most things are compatible, there are no conflicts in the device manager, and I have checked the registry and made the comparisons, HAL etc, all the same from that machine to this one.  My drive letter assignments are easy enough, the 4150 or from laptop has a C: Drive the hard disk and a D: Drive which is a  cd rom drive, which is swappable, the 500 or to laptop has a C: Drive the hard drive, and a D: Drive which is the external CDRW USB Drive I am unable to boot to, but can install software burn disks etc.  I almost started the Ntbackup.exe which I assume is started in the "start" > "run" menu item?  The only reason I hesistated so far, is I am wondering do all these things match up, like the registry comparisons, the file locations, and the like, because basically I have the 4150 from laptop hard drive in my 500 to laptop hard drive, right?  So how do I find the information otherwise?  In addition, no matter what I have done I have been unable to find the SYSVOL and the Active Directory (NDTS) So I felt that it seemed like a pretty crucial step so I am awaiting further instructions or clarification,  I am refraining from installing anything but essential software. Thanks CRAZYJOE !
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:youre1m
Comment Utility
Reynaldo,

Ignore any reference to sysvol and active directory, if Crazyone has mentioned it it's by mistake, but the rest of it is good. Device manager will show the devices for the machine it is running on, not the machine it was built on. You should move the HDD once you have changed the IDE drivers, it is probably the only problem. You may find that you have some unrecognised devices in device manager when you move the HDD, but you simply need to install the drivers for those devices. They are not conflicts, XP handles the IRQ's on it's own so you won't really get them, just driver issues.

Just try moving it and see how you get on, if it doesn't boot you will not have changed anything so you can simply go back to the original machine and make another change.
0

Featured Post

IT, Stop Being Called Into Every Meeting

Highfive is so simple that setting up every meeting room takes just minutes and every employee will be able to start or join a call from any room with ease. Never be called into a meeting just to get it started again. This is how video conferencing should work!

Join & Write a Comment

I don't know if many of you have made the great mistake of using the Cisco Thin Client model with the management software VXC. If you have then you are probably more then familiar with the incredibly clunky interface, the numerous work arounds, and …
#Citrix #POC #XenDesktop #vCenter #VMware #ESX
Internet Business Fax to Email Made Easy - With eFax Corporate (http://www.enterprise.efax.com), you'll receive a dedicated online fax number, which is used the same way as a typical analog fax number. You'll receive secure faxes in your email, fr…
Access reports are powerful and flexible. Learn how to create a query and then a grouped report using the wizard. Modify the report design after the wizard is done to make it look better. There will be another video to explain how to put the final p…

772 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

10 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now